Top digital security worries when it comes to remote employees

26% of remote workers have experienced a cyber attack personally, while 45% of employers have asked their employees to use their personal devices for work since the start of the pandemic, according to a Microsoft research.

digital security worries

The study surveyed 500 employees and 200 business decision makers in September 2020 about remote working, digital security behaviours, and the worries they now face.

Retrofitting cybersecurity

The accelerated transition to homeworking is placing pressure on organizations to support the unavoidable blending of personal and professional lives more than ever before.

However, this naturally creates new risks, including the increased risk of cyber attacks. This was reflected in the research which showed that only 17% of remote workers currently believe that the software and technology provided has done enough to protect their data.

This could be in some way due to the pace at which employers had to transition to remote working environments, with 36% of employers admitting they have spent the past few months putting in place the security, privacy, and workplace procedures required for today’s remote working world.

Remote workers’ information protection concerns

76% of workers were surprised with how well they had adapted to remote working. However, one in five employees feel their data is more vulnerable when working from home due to the absence of regular IT supports.

The research points to some potentially dangerous cybersecurity issues amongst remote workers:

  • Personal emails: 30% of workers still use personal email accounts to share confidential work materials.
  • Poor password hygiene: One third of workers use the same password to log into work and personal devices.
  • Unregulated access: 43% face/navigate no security restrictions when accessing work-related documents and materials remotely.

Employers’ security management concerns

One of the most concerning findings is that organizations are potentially side-stepping their own security procedures in the name of expediency:

  • Reactive approach: One third of employers acknowledge they are exposed since they had to make remote-working decisions and transitions so quickly.
  • Lack of devices: 45% of employers have had to ask their employees to use their personal devices for work purposes since the start of the pandemic.
  • No remote BYOD policies: 42% of employers are yet to secure those remote employee’s personal devices.

Furthermore, 41% of employers acknowledge it has become increasingly difficult to remain GDPR compliant because of the pandemic.

Evolving threat

The report identified an escalation in both the level and sophistication of attacks. For example:

  • Over 13bn malicious and suspicious mails were blocked, out of which more than 1bn were URLs set up for the explicit purpose of phishing credential attacks in 2019.
  • Ransomware is the most common reason behind Microsoft’s incident response engagements from October 2019 through July 2020.
  • The most common attack techniques used by nation-state actors in the past year are reconnaissance, credential harvesting, malware, and VPN exploits.
  • IoT threats are constantly expanding and evolving. The first half of 2020 saw an approximate 35% increase in total attack volume compared to the second half of 2019.

Des Ryan, Solutions Director for Microsoft Ireland, said: “Cyber hackers are opportunistic, skilled, and relentless. They have become adept at evolving their techniques to increase success rates, whether by experimenting with different phishing lures, adjusting the types of attacks they execute or finding new ways to hide their work.

“While our physical work locations may have changed, our responsibilities in protecting organizational data and complying to data regulations have not. Now is the time to address this with an increased investment in cybersecurity, secure devices, tighter policies, increased support, and education for employees so they can play an important role in not only protecting themselves but also their organizations.”

digital security worries

Cloud-based services and hybrid working

When asked about the future, 58% believe they will have a hybrid workforce in future as more staff work from home more of the time and others are in the office.

57% felt more positive about using cloud-based services, including productivity tools.

Remote priorities: Training, support and investment

However, the research shows that Irish organizations understand there is a gap with 41% admitting they are behind the curve when it comes to having the right digital services and technologies in place to deal with new working realities.

As a result of the move to remote working, employers are focused on investment in digital security. The research found:

  • 38% of organizations have already increased the level and detail of cybersecurity training for staff who are working from home.
  • A further 52% will prioritise investing in training in 2021.
  • 44% of workers would also welcome alternatives to passwords, with biometric verification (fingerprint or facial recognition) being the most popular options.

Encryption-based threats grow by 260% in 2020

New Zscaler threat research reveals the emerging techniques and impacted industries behind a 260-percent spike in attacks using encrypted channels to bypass legacy security controls.

encryption-based threats

Showing that cybercriminals will not be dissuaded by a global health crisis, they targeted the healthcare industry the most. Following healthcare, the research revealed the top industries under attack by SSL-based threats were:

1. Healthcare: 1.6 billion (25.5 percent)
2. Finance and Insurance: 1.2 billion (18.3 percent)
3. Manufacturing: 1.1 billion (17.4 percent)
4. Government: 952 million (14.3 percent)
5. Services: 730 million (13.8 percent)

COVID-19 is driving a ransomware surge

Researchers witnessed a 5x increase in ransomware attacks over encrypted traffic beginning in March, when the World Health Organization declared the virus a pandemic. Earlier research from Zscaler indicated a 30,000 percent spike in COVID-related threats, when cybercriminals first began preying on fears of the virus.

Phishing attacks neared 200 million

As one of the most commonly used attacks over SSL, phishing attempts reached more than 193 million instances during the first nine months of 2020. The manufacturing sector was the most targeted (38.6 percent) followed by services (13.8 percent), and healthcare (10.9 percent).

30 percent of SSL-based attacks spoofed trusted cloud providers

Cybercriminals continue to become more sophisticated in avoiding detection, taking advantage of the reputations of trusted cloud providers such as Dropbox, Google, Microsoft, and Amazon to deliver malware over encrypted channels.

Microsoft remains most targeted brand for SSL-based phishing

Since Microsoft technology is among the most adopted in the world, Zscaler identified Microsoft as the most frequently spoofed brand for phishing attacks, which is consistent with ThreatLabZ 2019 report. Other popular brands for spoofing included PayPal and Google. Cybercriminals are also increasingly spoofing Netflix and other streaming entertainment services during the pandemic.

“Cybercriminals are shamelessly attacking critical industries like healthcare, government and finance during the pandemic, and this research shows how risky encrypted traffic can be if not inspected,” said Deepen Desai, CISO and VP of Security Research at Zscaler. “Attackers have significantly advanced the methods they use to deliver ransomware, for example, inside of an organization utilizing encrypted traffic. The report shows a 500 percent increase in ransomware attacks over SSL, and this is just one example to why SSL inspection is so important to an organization’s defense.”

November 2020 Patch Tuesday forecast: Significant OS changes ahead

November Patch Tuesday and the end-of-year holidays are rapidly approaching. Microsoft gave us a late release or maybe an early gift depending upon how you look at the new version of Windows 10. The Patch Tuesday updates appear to be light, so things are looking much better as we enter the final stretch for 2020.

November 2020 Patch Tuesday forecast

The big announcement this month is the release of Windows 10 version 20H2 on October 20. Yes, you read that correctly – not the 2020 Fall Release or Windows 10 version 2009, but Windows 10 version 20H2. Name changes once again!

This update follows the feature enablement model that began last year with Windows 10 versions 1903 and 1909. The new features in Windows 10 version 20H2 are also included in the October cumulative update for Windows 10 version 2004, although they are dormant. They can be turned on via a special enablement package.

A big change regarding servicing stack updates (SSU) and the latest cumulative updates (LCU) has finally been made – LCUs and SSUs have been combined into a single cumulative monthly update! Moving forward we don’t have to worry about managing these separately. Microsoft recommends applying the latest SSU for Windows 10, version 2004 and then you can forget about SSUs in the future because they are automatically applied as needed in the cumulative updates.

This release also includes a few security updates for Microsoft Defender Advanced Threat Protection (ATP), Microsoft Defender Application Guard for Office, and biometric enhancements for Windows Hello.

Each new release comes with its share of reported issues, so please review before you update to this latest version. From some of the forums I monitor, I’ve noted a lot of conversations around device drivers and device support in general. I suspect this is not an issue unique to Windows 10 version 20H2, but is part of a carryover from Microsoft now enforcing properly signed drivers, which began last month in the cumulative update. There are a lot of good reasons to update your OS, but always ‘look before you leap’ to ensure a smooth transition.

November 2020 Patch Tuesday forecast

  • Expect Microsoft to get back on track this month. There was a major dip in common vulnerabilities and exposures (CVEs) addressed last month, and for the first time I can remember there were no updates for Internet Explorer or Edge. Anticipate updates for the standard operating systems, browsers, Office, and extended support updates for Windows 7 and Server 2008. Servicing stack updates to include ESUs are expected.
  • Security updates were released this week for Adobe Acrobat and Reader, so I don’t expect anything next week.
  • Apple released their latest security updates for iTunes and iCloud in late September. The next updates will probably show up late this month or early December.
  • Google Chrome 86 was updated this week with a few security updates; there is a slight chance another release may come out on Patch Tuesday but don’t count on it.
  • Mozilla Firefox and Thunderbird were updated in mid-October. We should see some additional security updates next week.
  • It looks like an average Patch Tuesday for November. If you have some spare time, check out Microsoft’s latest and greatest in Windows 10 version 20H2.

Google discloses actively exploited Windows zero-day (CVE-2020-17087)

Google researchers have made public a Windows kernel zero day vulnerability (CVE-2020-17087) that is being exploited in the wild in tandem with a Google Chrome flaw (CVE-2020-15999) that has been patched on October 20.

CVE-2020-17087

About CVE-2020-17087

CVE-2020-17087 is a vulnerability in the Windows Kernel Cryptography Driver, and “constitutes a locally accessible attack surface that can be exploited for privilege escalation (such as sandbox escape).”

More technical information has been provided in the Chromium issue tracker entry, which was kept unaccessible to the wider public for the first seven days, but has now been made public.

The researchers have also included PoC exploit code, which has been tested on Windows 10 1903 (64-bit), but they noted that the affected driver (cng.sys) “looks to have been present since at least Windows 7,” meaning that all the other supported Windows versions are probably vulnerable.

Exploitation and patching

Shane Huntley, Director of Google’s Threat Analysis Group (TAG) confirmed that the vulnerability chain is being used for targeted exploitation and that the attacks are “not related to any US election-related targeting.”

The attackers are using the Chrome bug to gain access to the target system and then the CVE-2020-17087 to gain administrator access on it.

A patch for the issue is expected to be released on November 10, as part of the monthly Patch Tuesday effort by Microsoft.

Currently we expect a patch for this issue to be available on November 10.

While the bug is serious, the fact that it’s being used in targeted (and not widespread) attacks should reassure most users they’ll be safe until the patch is released.

Also, according to a Microsoft spokesperson, exploitation of the flaw has only been spotted in conjuction with the Chrome vulnerability, which has been patched in Chrome and other Chromium-based browsers (e.g., Opera on October 21, Microsoft Edge on October 22.

Users who have implemented those updates are, therefore, safer still.

A new threat matrix outlines attacks against machine learning systems

A report published last year has noted that most attacks against artificial intelligence (AI) systems are focused on manipulating them (e.g., influencing recommendation systems to favor specific content), but that new attacks using machine learning (ML) are within attackers’ capabilities.

attacks machine learning systems

Microsoft now says that attacks on machine learning (ML) systems are on the uptick and MITRE notes that, in the last three years, “major companies such as Google, Amazon, Microsoft, and Tesla, have had their ML systems tricked, evaded, or misled.” At the same time, most businesses don’t have the right tools in place to secure their ML systems and are looking for guidance.

Experts at Microsoft, MITRE, IBM, NVIDIA, the University of Toronto, the Berryville Institute of Machine Learning and several other companies and educational organizations have therefore decided to create the first version of the Adversarial ML Threat Matrix, to help security analysts detect and respond to this new type of threat.

What is machine learning (ML)?

Machine learning is a subset of artificial intelligence (AI). It is based on computer algorithms that ingest “training” data and “learn” from it, and finally deliver predictions, decisions, or accurately classify things.

Machine learning algorithms are used for tasks like identifying spam, detecting new threats, predicting user preferences, performing medical diagnoses, and so on.

Security should be built in

Mikel Rodriguez, a machine learning researcher at MITRE who also oversees MITRE’s Decision Science research programs, says that we’re now at the same stage with AI as we were with the internet in the late 1980s, when people were just trying to make the internet work and when they weren’t thinking about building in security.

We can learn from that mistake, though, and that’s one of the reasons the Adversarial ML Threat Matrix has been created.

“With this threat matrix, security analysts will be able to work with threat models that are grounded in real-world incidents that emulate adversary behavior with machine learning,” he noted.

Also, the matrix will help them think holistically and spur better communication and collaboration across organizations by giving a common language or taxonomy of the different vulnerabilities, he says.

The Adversarial ML Threat Matrix

“Unlike traditional cybersecurity vulnerabilities that are tied to specific software and hardware systems, adversarial ML vulnerabilities are enabled by inherent limitations underlying ML algorithms. Data can be weaponized in new ways which requires an extension of how we model cyber adversary behavior, to reflect emerging threat vectors and the rapidly evolving adversarial machine learning attack lifecycle,” MITRE noted.

The matrix has been modeled on the MITRE ATT&CK framework.

attacks machine learning systems

The group has demonstrated how previous attacks – whether by researchers, read teams or online mobs – can be mapped to the matrix.

They also stressed that it’s going to be routinely updated as feedback from the security and adversarial machine learning community is received. They encourage contributors to point out new techniques, propose best (defense) practices, and share examples of successful attacks on machine learning (ML) systems.

“We are especially excited for new case-studies! We look forward to contributions from both industry and academic researchers,” MITRE concluded.

25 vulnerabilities exploited by Chinese state-sponsored hackers

The US Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) has released a list of 25 vulnerabilities Chinese state-sponsored hackers have been recently scanning for or have exploited in attacks.

vulnerabilities exploited Chinese hackers

“Most of the vulnerabilities […] can be exploited to gain initial access to victim networks using products that are directly accessible from the Internet and act as gateways to internal networks. The majority of the products are either for remote access or for external web services, and should be prioritized for immediate patching,” the agency noted.

The list of vulnerabilities exploited by Chinese hackers

The list is as follows:

The vulnerability list they shared is likely not complete, as Chinese-sponsored actors may use other known and unknown vulnerabilities. All network defenders – but especially those working on securing critical systems in organizations on which US national security and defense are depending on – should consider patching these as a priority.

Mitigations are also available

If patching is not possible, the risk of exploitation for most of these can be lowered by implementing mitigations provided by the vendors. CISA also advises implementing general mitigations like:

  • Disabling external management capabilities and setting up an out-of-band management network
  • Blocking obsolete or unused protocols at the network edge and disabling them in device configurations
  • Isolating Internet-facing services in a network DMZ to reduce the exposure of the internal network
  • Enabling robust logging of Internet-facing services and monitoring the logs for signs of compromise

The agency also noted that the problem of data stolen or modified before a device has been patched cannot be solved only by patching, and that password changes and reviews of accounts are a good practice.

Additional “most exploited vulnerabilities” lists

Earlier this year, CISA released a list of old and new software vulnerabilities that are routinely exploited by foreign cyber actors and cyber criminals, the NSA and the Australian Signals Directorate released a list of web application vulnerabilities that are commonly exploited to install web shell malware, and Recorded Future published a list of ten software vulnerabilities most exploited by cybercriminals in 2019.

Admins and network defenders are encouraged to peruse them and patch those flaws as well.

Preventing cybersecurity’s perfect storm

Zerologon might have been cybersecurity’s perfect storm: that moment when multiple conditions collide to create a devastating disaster. Thanks to Secura and Microsoft’s rapid response, it wasn’t.

Zerologon scored a perfect 10 CVSS score. Threats rating a perfect 10 are easy to execute and have deep-reaching impact. Fortunately, they aren’t frequent, especially in prominent software brands such as Windows. Still, organizations that perpetually lag when it comes to patching become prime targets for cybercriminals. Flaws like Zerologon are rare, but there’s no reason to assume that the next attack will not be using a perfect 10 CVSS vulnerability, this time a zero-day.

Zerologon: Unexpected squall

Zerologon escalates a domain user beyond their current role and permissions to a Windows Domain Administrator. This vulnerability is trivially easy to exploit. While it seems that the most obvious threat is a disgruntled insider, attackers may target any average user. The most significant risk comes from a user with an already compromised system.

In this scenario, a bad actor has already taken over an end user’s system but is constrained only to their current level of access. By executing this exploit, the bad actor can break out of their existing permissions box. This attack grants them the proverbial keys to the kingdom in a Windows domain to access whatever Windows-based devices they wish.

Part of why Zerologon is problematic is that many organizations rely on Windows as an authoritative identity for a domain. To save time, they promote their Windows Domain Administrators to an Administrator role throughout the organizational IT ecosystem and assign bulk permissions, rather than adding them individually. This method eases administration by removing the need to update the access permissions frequently as these users change jobs. This practice violates the principle of least privilege, leaving an opening for anyone with a Windows Domain Administrator role to exercise broad-reaching access rights beyond what they require to fulfill the role.

Beware of sharks

Advanced preparation for attacks like these requires a fundamental paradigm shift in organizational boundary definitions away from a legacy mentality to a more modern cybersecurity mindset. The traditional castle model assumes all threats remain outside the firewall boundary and trust everything either natively internal or connected via VPN to some degree.

Modern cybersecurity professionals understand the advantage of controls like zero standing privilege (ZSP), which authorizes no one and requires that each user request access and evaluation before granting privileged access. Think of it much like the security check at an airport. To get in, everyone —passenger, pilot, even store staff— needs to be inspected, prove they belong and have nothing questionable in their possession.

This continual re-certification prevents users from gaining access once they’ve experienced an event that alters their eligibility, such as leaving the organization or changing positions. Checking permissions before approving them ensures only those who currently require a resource can access it.

My hero zero (standing privilege)

Implementing the design concept of zero standing privilege is crucial to hardening against privilege escalation attacks, as it removes the administrator’s vast amounts of standing power and access. Users acquire these rights for a limited period and only on an as-needed basis. This Just-In-Time (JIT) method of provisioning creates a better access review process. Requests are either granted time-bound access or flagged for escalation to a human approver, ensuring automation oversight.

An essential component of zero standing privilege is avoiding super-user roles and access. Old school practitioners may find it odd and question the impact on daily administrative tasks that keep the ecosystem running. Users manage these tasks through heavily logged time-limited permission assignments. Reliable user behavior analytics, combined with risk-based privileged access management (PAM) and machine learning supported log analysis, offers organizations better contextual identity information. Understanding how their privileged access is leveraged and identifying access misuse before it takes root is vital to preventing a breach.

Peering into the depths

To even start with zero standing privilege, an organization must understand what assets they consider privileged. The categorization of digital assets begins the process. The next step is assigning ownership of these resources. Doing this allows organizations to configure the PAM software to accommodate the policies and access rules defined organizationally, ensuring access rules meet governance and compliance requirements.

The PAM solution requires in-depth visibility of each individual’s full access across all cloud and SaaS environments, as well as throughout the internal IT infrastructure. This information improves the identification of toxic combinations, where granted permissions create compliance issues such as segregation of duties (SoD) violations.

AI & UEBA to the rescue

Zero standing privilege generates a large number of user logs and behavioral information over time. Manual log review becomes unsustainable very quickly. Leveraging the power of AI and machine learning to derive intelligent analytics allows organizations to identify risky behaviors and locate potential breaches far faster than human users.

Integration of a user and entity behavior analytics (UEBA) software establishes baselines of behavior, triggering alerts when deviations occur. UEBA systems detect insider threats and advanced persistent threats (APTs) while generating contextual identity information.

UEBA systems track all behavior linked back to an entity and identify anomalous behaviors such as spikes in access requests, requesting access to data that would typically not be allowed for that user’s roles, or systematically accessing numerous items. Contextual information helps organizations identifying situations that might indicate a breach or point to unauthorized exfiltration of data.

Your compass points to ZTA

Protecting against privilege escalation threats requires more than merely staying up to date on patches. Part of stopping attacks like Zerologon is to re-imagine how security is architected in an organization. Centering identity as the new security perimeter and implementing zero standing privilege are essential to the foundation of a security model known as zero trust architecture (ZTA).

Zero trust architecture has existed for a while in the corporate world. It is gaining attention from the public sector since NIST’s recent approval of SP-207 outlined ZTA and how to leverage it for the government agencies. NIST’s sanctification of ZTA opened the doors for government entities and civilian contractors to incorporate it into their security model. Taking this route helps to close the privilege escalation pathway providing your organization a secure harbor in the event of another cybersecurity perfect storm.

eSentire launches automated detection and response solution for Microsoft Security products

eSentire unveiled eSentire Cloud Automation Security Assistant (CASA), the company’s automated detection and response solution for Microsoft Security products.

eSentire CASA

With CASA, eSentire brings its MDR leadership and expertise from over 10 years of threat hunting to Microsoft users.

CASA offers customers a single place within Microsoft Teams to actively manage alerts, engage eSentire experts on demand, and launch automated threat configurations for Microsoft Cloud Application Security, Microsoft 365, Microsoft Defender for Endpoint, Microsoft Azure, and Microsoft Graph Security API.

CASA, delivered on the eSentire Atlas Extended Detection and Response (XDR) platform, aggregates and enriches alerts to prioritize what matters and provides customers with the information needed to make security decisions, all within their existing Microsoft Teams app. The entire deployment process takes less than five minutes with the Microsoft products you already have.

Clicking “Ask eSentire” in Teams allows customers to ask eSentire security specialists questions about high-risk alerts. These specialists can then assist in further investigation, and provide recommendations for remediation and threat containment.

The Atlas XDR platform natively integrates endpoint, network, log, asset, and vulnerability data into a cohesive security operations system that supports nearly 1,000 MDR customers today.

Microsoft customers can benefit from the visibility and learnings eSentire has from stopping threats from its global customer base across 60 different countries with over $6 trillion in assets under protection. Atlas XDR platform now supports the entire Microsoft 365 security suite alongside the company’s existing detection and response products.

“CASA simplifies the daily operational life for security teams by providing alert consolidation, expert advice, and automated configuration. We are excited to make this capability broadly available in the market to users looking to leverage the Microsoft security ecosystem,” said Dustin Hillard, CTO for eSentire.

Critical infrastructure and industrial orgs can test Azure Defender for IoT for free

Azure Defender for IoT – Microsoft’s new security solution for discovering unmanaged IoT/OT assets and IoT/OT vulnerabilities – is now in public preview and can be put to the test free of charge.

The solution can alert administrators about unauthorized devices connected to the network and unauthorized connections to the internet, changes to firmware versions, potentially malicious commands, illegal DNP3 operations, known malware, unauthorized SMB logins, and more.

Azure Defender for IoT

About Azure Defender for IoT

“As industrial and critical infrastructure organizations implement digital transformation, the number of networked IoT and Operational Technology (OT) devices has greatly proliferated. Many of these devices lack visibility by IT teams and are often unpatched and misconfigured, making them soft targets for adversaries looking to pivot deeper into corporate networks,” Phil Neray, Director of Azure IoT Security Strategy at Microsoft, explained.

Azure Defender for IoT enables agentless IoT/OT asset discovery, vulnerability management, and continuous threat monitoring.

The solution can be deployed on-premises and can be integrated with (i.e., send data/alerts to) Azure Sentinel, Microsoft’s cloud-native security information event management (SIEM) and security orchestration automated response (SOAR) solution. It can also be deployed without sending any data to Azure.

After being connected to the existing network, the solution uses IoT/OT-aware behavioral analytics and machine learning to eliminate the need to configure any rules, signatures, or other static IOCs, says Neray.

“To capture the traffic, it uses an on-premises network sensor deployed as a virtual or physical appliance connected to a SPAN port or tap. The sensor implements non-invasive passive monitoring with Network Traffic Analysis (NTA) and Layer 7 Deep Packet Inspection (DPI) to extract detailed IoT/OT information in real-time.”

Azure Defender for IoT

Out-of-the box integration with third-party IT security tools (e.g., Splunk, IBM QRadar, and ServiceNow) is available, and the solution woks seamlessly with diverse automation equipment by Rockwell Automation, Schneider Electric, GE, Emerson, Siemens, Honeywell, ABB, Yokogawa, and so on.

US Cyber Command and Microsoft Are Both Disrupting TrickBot

Earlier this month, we learned that someone is disrupting the TrickBot botnet network.

Over the past 10 days, someone has been launching a series of coordinated attacks designed to disrupt Trickbot, an enormous collection of more than two million malware-infected Windows PCs that are constantly being harvested for financial data and are often used as the entry point for deploying ransomware within compromised organizations.

On Sept. 22, someone pushed out a new configuration file to Windows computers currently infected with Trickbot. The crooks running the Trickbot botnet typically use these config files to pass new instructions to their fleet of infected PCs, such as the Internet address where hacked systems should download new updates to the malware.

But the new configuration file pushed on Sept. 22 told all systems infected with Trickbot that their new malware control server had the address 127.0.0.1, which is a “localhost” address that is not reachable over the public Internet, according to an analysis by cyber intelligence firm Intel 471.

A few days ago, the Washington Post reported that it’s the work of US Cyber Command:

U.S. Cyber Command’s campaign against the Trickbot botnet, an army of at least 1 million hijacked computers run by Russian-speaking criminals, is not expected to permanently dismantle the network, said four U.S. officials, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because of the matter’s sensitivity. But it is one way to distract them at least for a while as they seek to restore operations.

The network is controlled by “Russian speaking criminals,” and the fear is that it will be used to disrupt the US election next month.

The effort is part of what Gen. Paul Nakasone, the head of Cyber Command, calls “persistent engagement,” or the imposition of cumulative costs on an adversary by keeping them constantly engaged. And that is a key feature of CyberCom’s activities to help protect the election against foreign threats, officials said.

Here’s General Nakasone talking about persistent engagement.

Microsoft is also disrupting Trickbot:

We disrupted Trickbot through a court order we obtained as well as technical action we executed in partnership with telecommunications providers around the world. We have now cut off key infrastructure so those operating Trickbot will no longer be able to initiate new infections or activate ransomware already dropped into computer systems.

[…]

We took today’s action after the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia granted our request for a court order to halt Trickbot’s operations.

During the investigation that underpinned our case, we were able to identify operational details including the infrastructure Trickbot used to communicate with and control victim computers, the way infected computers talk with each other, and Trickbot’s mechanisms to evade detection and attempts to disrupt its operation. As we observed the infected computers connect to and receive instructions from command and control servers, we were able to identify the precise IP addresses of those servers. With this evidence, the court granted approval for Microsoft and our partners to disable the IP addresses, render the content stored on the command and control servers inaccessible, suspend all services to the botnet operators, and block any effort by the Trickbot operators to purchase or lease additional servers.

To execute this action, Microsoft formed an international group of industry and telecommunications providers. Our Digital Crimes Unit (DCU) led investigation efforts including detection, analysis, telemetry, and reverse engineering, with additional data and insights to strengthen our legal case from a global network of partners including FS-ISAC, ESET, Lumen’s Black Lotus Labs, NTT and Symantec, a division of Broadcom, in addition to our Microsoft Defender team. Further action to remediate victims will be supported by internet service providers (ISPs) and computer emergency readiness teams (CERTs) around the world.

This action also represents a new legal approach that our DCU is using for the first time. Our case includes copyright claims against Trickbot’s malicious use of our software code. This approach is an important development in our efforts to stop the spread of malware, allowing us to take civil action to protect customers in the large number of countries around the world that have these laws in place.

Brian Krebs comments:

In legal filings, Microsoft argued that Trickbot irreparably harms the company “by damaging its reputation, brands, and customer goodwill. Defendants physically alter and corrupt Microsoft products such as the Microsoft Windows products. Once infected, altered and controlled by Trickbot, the Windows operating system ceases to operate normally and becomes tools for Defendants to conduct their theft.”

This is a novel use of trademark law.

ITC Secure unveils MDR service, offering 24/7 access to a team of highly-skilled security experts

ITC Secure announced the launch of a new Managed Detection and Response (MDR) service, providing businesses with a complete security solution with 24/7 access to a team of highly-skilled security experts who proactively hunt, detect and contain cyber threats.

“As enterprises realise it’s not a question of if but when a cyber attack will take place, many businesses are re-evaluating their security operations and turning to MDR solutions to secure their sensitive data assets and gain the visibility and support needed to defend against ever-evolving threats,” said Arno Robbertse, Chief Executive, ITC Secure.

In addition to addressing current industry trends driven by mandates to comply with regulatory and data protection laws, sophisticated attacks and budget constraints, the new MDR service will support businesses through their cloud digital transformation initiatives, focussing on a more proactive approach to security, with a faster-to-deploy solution, as more enterprises migrate to perimeter-less security.

“Security is so important to us and our clients, even more so now given the increasingly digital nature of how we work. Moving to an MDR service with our long term security partner ITC will help us step up to the next level of protection in this ever challenging area, and I’m really excited to see the results start to bear fruit for us,” said Orlando Milford, CIO, Oxera Consulting LLP.

The launch is the next phase of the journey as ITC continues to enhance its portfolio of services based on the Microsoft security stack, with the MDR service expanding on ITC’s existing managed Sentinel SIEM service.

Delivered and managed from ITC’s London-based, Security Operations Centre, the new service leverages Microsoft’s Defender for Endpoint (previously known as Defender Advanced Threat Protection) and the cloud-native SIEM tool, Azure Sentinel.

ITC’s MDR service includes:

  • 24x7x365 SOC management, detection and response
  • Security recommendations and advice
  • Empower in-house teams
  • Seamless integration across Microsoft security portfolio and ITSM tools

Microsoft and partners cut off key Trickbot botnet infrastructure

Two weeks after someone (allegedly the US Cyber Command) temporarily interrupted the operation of the infamous Trickbot botnet, a coalition of tech companies headed by Microsoft has struck a serious blow against its operators.

Trickbot botnet

“We disrupted Trickbot through a court order we obtained as well as technical action we executed in partnership with telecommunications providers around the world. We have now cut off key infrastructure so those operating Trickbot will no longer be able to initiate new infections or activate ransomware already dropped into computer systems,” shared Tom Burt, corporate VP, Customer Security and Trust, Microsoft.

About Trickbot and the Trickbot botnet

Trickbot, which dates back to 2016, was originally a banking trojan, but due to its modular nature it is now capable of much more: gathering saved and entered credentials, browser histories, network and system information, installing a backdoor, harvesting email addresses, running various commands on a Windows domain controller to steal Active Directory credentials, launching brute force attacks against selected Windows systems running a RDP connection exposed to the Internet, and downloading and loading ransomware on the infected computer.

The malware is often delivered through spam and spear phishing campaigns, and occasionally through the Emotet botnet.

“In recent times, Trickbot has been implicated in targeted ransomware attacks, where credentials stolen by the malware were used by the Ryuk ransomware operators to compromise victims’ networks and encrypt all accessible computers. This assessment has been confirmed by Europol, which recently noted that ‘the relationship between Emotet [another botnet], Ryuk and Trickbot is considered one of the most notable in the cybercrime world’,” Symantec (Broadcom) researchers noted.

“Trickbot has infected over a million computing devices around the world since late 2016. While the exact identity of the operators is unknown, research suggests they serve both nation-states and criminal networks for a variety of objectives,” Burt explained, and noted that beyond infecting end user computers, Trickbot has also infected a number of IoT devices, such as routers.

Disruption attempts

Since late September, Trickbot has been hit twice by (then-unknown) attackers.

According to Brian Krebs, they first pushed out a new configuration file to Windows computers infected with Trickbot, instructing them to consider 127.0.0.1 (a “localhost” address) their new control server.

A week later, they did it again, but at the same time, “someone stuffed the control networks that the Trickbot operators use to keep track of data on infected systems with millions of new records,” apparently in an attempt to “dilute the Trickbot database and confuse or stymie the Trickbot operators.”

These efforts, which were subsequently revealed to have been mounted by the US Cyber Command, did not permanently affect the botnet.

But the technical and legal efforts lead by Microsoft and supported by FS-ISAC, ESET, Lumen’s Black Lotus Labs, NTT and Broadcom’s Symantec division are expected to considerably affect the botnet’s operation.

After gathering enough information about the botnet’s operation and C&C servers, Microsoft went to the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia, which then court granted approval for Microsoft and partners to “disable the IP addresses, render the content stored on the command and control servers inaccessible, suspend all services to the botnet operators, and block any effort by the Trickbot operators to purchase or lease additional servers.”

The operation will be followed by further action by ISPs and CERTs around the world, who will attempt to reach Trickbot victims and help them remove the malware from their systems.

“This action also represents a new legal approach that our DCU is using for the first time. Our case includes copyright claims against Trickbot’s malicious use of our software code. This approach is an important development in our efforts to stop the spread of malware, allowing us to take civil action to protect customers in the large number of countries around the world that have these laws in place,” Burt pointed out.

“While our work might not remove the threat posed by TrickBot, it will raise the cost of doing business for the criminal gang behind the botnet because they will be forced to divert resources away from exploitation activities in order to rebuild the parts of their infrastructure that we disrupted,” the Black Lotus Labs team noted.

October 2020 Patch Tuesday forecast: Trick or treat?

It’s October and that means Halloween will be here at the end of the month. It won’t be much fun if we only get to ‘dress up’ and look at each other via video conference. But then, we’ve had a lot of ‘tricks’ thrown at us this last month – Zerologon, explosion of ransomware, COVID phishing attacks, and more. Will we get more tricks next week or are we in for a treat on Patch Tuesday?

October 2020 Patch Tuesday forecast

The Netlogon Elevation of Privilege Vulnerability, CVE-2020-1472, also referred to as the Zerologon vulnerability, dominated the news this past month. The US Department of Homeland Security issued Emergency Directive 20-04 on September 18, requiring all government agencies with a domain controller to update their servers within three days.

Microsoft has also issued updated guidance since the August Patch Tuesday release to clarify the steps needed to secure systems with this vulnerability. Per the outlined process in the article, the first step is to apply the August 11 updates which will begin enforcement of Secure RPC (Remote Procedure Call), but still allow non-compliant devices to connect and log the connections. Full enforcement will begin with the deployment of the February 9, 2021 updates.

All systems in your environment should be updated and monitored between now and February to verify they are configured and using the secure channels properly. Once the February updates are deployed, only vulnerable systems explicitly listed in group policy will be allowed to connect to the domain controller.

It’s not unexpected that the education community has been hit the hardest by cyberattacks in the past several months. Students of all ages are now spending many hours online in daily remote learning sessions and are constantly exposed to a full host of attacks. The Microsoft Security Intelligence center is showing that 62% of malware encounters are affecting this industry.

As funny as it may sound, this is partially an ‘education’ issue. Most students haven’t received any form of security training and need to be aware of phishing attacks and what to look for, the importance of strong passwords, the need to keep personal or ‘sensitive’ information private, and similar practices we in the industry often take for granted.

With the sudden increase of connections from personal computers, many of which are running out-of-date software, it is more important than ever to maintain solid security practices for the infrastructure and support systems. Teachers should be running authorized software and IT must be prepared to apply the latest security updates, especially for programs like Zoom, WebEx, GoToMeeting, etc., which are critical for remote learning. We’ll weather this storm and the good news is that we’ll have a more security-aware group entering the workforce in the upcoming years.

October 2020 Patch Tuesday forecast

  • Microsoft continues to address record numbers of vulnerabilities each month. Expect that to continue in October. Microsoft Exchange Server received a major update last month, so I don’t expect another one. But we will see the standard updates for operating systems and Office, and extended support updates for Windows 7 and Server 2008.
  • Select service stack updates (SSUs) should appear as they usually do.
  • The last security updates for Adobe Acrobat and Reader were in August. There are no pre-announcements on their web site, but we may see an update.
  • Apple will most likely release major security updates for iTunes and iCloud later in October if they maintain their quarterly schedule.
  • Google Chrome 86 was released this Tuesday with significant security updates. Don’t expect any updates around Patch Tuesday.
  • Security updates were released on September 22 for Mozilla Firefox and Thunderbird. We could see some additional updates next week.

In summary, expect the standard set of Microsoft releases, maybe some updates from Adobe, and probably two from Mozilla. Based on this limited list of updates, It sounds like we should be in for a treat!

The biggest cyber threats organizations deal with today

Microsoft has released a new report outlining enterprise cyberattack trends in the past year (July 2019 – June 2020) and offering advice on how organizations can protect themselves.

Based on over 8 trillion daily security signals and observations from the company’s security and threat intelligence experts, the Microsoft Digital Defense Report 2020 draws a distinction between attacks mounted by cybercriminals and those by nation-state attackers.

The cybercrime threat

In the past year, cybercriminals:

  • Were quick to exploit the fear and uncertainty associated with COVID-19 as a lure in phishing emails, and the popularity of some SaaS offerings and other services
  • Exploited the lack of basic security hygiene and well-known vulnerabilities to gain access to enterprise systems and networks
  • Exploited supply chain (in)security by hitting vulnerable third-party services, open source software and IoT devices and using them as a way into the target organization

More often than not, phishing emails impersonate a well-known service such as Office 365 (Microsoft), Zoom, Amazon or Apple, in an attempt to harvest login credentials.

“While credential phishing and BEC continue to be the dominant variations, we also see attacks on a user’s identity and credential being attempted via password reuse and password spray attacks using legacy email protocols such as IMAP and SMTP,” Microsoft noted.

The attackers’ reason for exploiting these legacy authentication protocols is simple: they don’t support multi-factor authentication (MFA). Microsoft advises on enabling MFA and disabling legacy authentication.

Cybercriminals are also:

  • Increasingly use cloud services and compromised email and web hosting infrastructures to orchestrate phishing campaigns
  • Rapidly changing campaigns (sending domains, email addresses, content templates, and URL domains)
  • Constantly changing and evolving payload delivery mechanisms (poisoned search results, custom 404 pages hosting phishing payloads, etc.)

One of the biggest and most disruptive cybercrime threat in the past year was ransomware – particularly “human-operated” ransomware wielded by gangs that target ogranizations they believe will part with big sums if affected.

These gangs sweep the internet for easy entry points or use commodity malware to gain access to company networks and change ransomware payloads and attack tools depending on the “terrain” they landed in (and to avoid attribution).

“Ransomware criminals are intimately familiar with systems management concepts and the struggles IT departments face. Attack patterns demonstrate that cybercriminals know when there will be change freezes, such as holidays, that will impact an organization’s ability to make changes (such as patching) to harden their networks,” Microsoft explained.

“They’re aware of when there are business needs that will make businesses more willing to pay ransoms than take downtime, such as during billing cycles in the health, finance, and legal industries. Targeting networks where critical work was needed during the COVID-19 pandemic, and also specifically attacking remote access devices during a time when unprecedented numbers of people were working remotely, are examples of this level of knowledge.”

Some of them have even shortened their in-network dwell time before deploying the ransomware, going from initial entry to ransoming the entire network in less than 45 minutes.

Gerrit Lansing, Field CTO, Stealthbits, commented that the speed at which a targeted ransomware attack can happen is really determined by one thing: how quickly an adversary can compromise administrative privileges in Microsoft Active Directory.

“Going from initial infiltration to total ownership of Active Directory can be a matter of seconds. Once these privileges are compromised, an adversary’s ability to deploy ransomware to all machines joined to Active Directory is unfettered, which explains how an adversary can go from initial infiltration to total ransomware infection in such a short period of time,” he noted.

Finally, to counter the threat of supply chain insecurity, Microsoft advises companiessupply to:

  • Vet their service providers thoroughly
  • Use systems to automatically identify open source software components and vulnerabilities in them
  • Map IoT assets, apply security policies to reduce the attack surface, and to use a different network for IoT devices and be familiar with all exposed interfaces

enterprise cyberattack trends 2020

Nation-state threats

The company has been following and mapping the activities of a number of nation-state actors and has found that – based on the nation state notifications they deliver to their customers – the attackers’ primary targets are not in the critical infrastructure sectors.

Instead, the top targeted industry sectors are non-governmental organizations (advocacy groups, human rights organizations, nonprofit organizations, etc.) and professional services (consulting firms and contractors):

enterprise cyberattack trends 2020

Microsoft found the most common attack techniques used by nation-state actors in the past year are reconnaissance, credential harvesting, malware, and VPN exploits. Web shell-based attacks are also on the rise.

The report delineates steps organizations can take to counter each of these threats as well as to improve their security and the security of their remote workforce.

“Given the leap in attack sophistication in the past year, it is more important than ever that we take steps to establish new rules of the road for cyberspace; that all organizations, whether government agencies or businesses, invest in people and technology to help stop attacks; and that people focus on the basics, including regular application of security updates, comprehensive backup policies, and, especially, enabling MFA. Our data shows that enabling MFA would alone have prevented the vast majority of successful attacks,” the Microsoft Security Team concluded.

Who’s Behind Monday’s 14-State 911 Outage?

Emergency 911 systems were down for more than an hour on Monday in towns and cities across 14 U.S. states. The outages led many news outlets to speculate the problem was related to Microsoft‘s Azure web services platform, which also was struggling with a widespread outage at the time. However, multiple sources tell KrebsOnSecurity the 911 issues stemmed from some kind of technical snafu involving Intrado and Lumen, two companies that together handle 911 calls for a broad swath of the United States.

Image: West.com

On the afternoon of Monday, Sept. 28, several states including Arizona, California, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota, Nevada, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Washington reported 911 outages in various cities and localities.

Multiple news reports suggested the outages might have been related to an ongoing service disruption at Microsoft. But a spokesperson for the software giant told KrebsOnSecurity, “we’ve seen no indication that the multi-state 911 outage was a result of yesterday’s Azure service disruption.”

Inquiries made with emergency dispatch centers at several of the towns and cities hit by the 911 outage pointed to a different source: Omaha, Neb.-based Intrado — until last year known as West Safety Communications — a provider of 911 and emergency communications infrastructure, systems and services to telecommunications companies and public safety agencies throughout the country.

Intrado did not respond to multiple requests for comment. But according to officials in Henderson County, NC, which experienced its own 911 failures yesterday, Intrado said the outage was the result of a problem with an unspecified service provider.

“On September 28, 2020, at 4:30pm MT, our 911 Service Provider observed conditions internal to their network that resulted in impacts to 911 call delivery,” reads a statement Intrado provided to county officials. “The impact was mitigated, and service was restored and confirmed to be functional by 5:47PM MT.  Our service provider is currently working to determine root cause.”

The service provider referenced in Intrado’s statement appears to be Lumen, a communications firm and 911 provider that until very recently was known as CenturyLink Inc. A look at the company’s status page indicates multiple Lumen systems experienced total or partial service disruptions on Monday, including its private and internal cloud networks and its control systems network.

Lumen’s status page indicates the company’s private and internal cloud and control system networks had outages or service disruptions on Monday.

In a statement provided to KrebsOnSecurity, Lumen blamed the issue on Intrado.

“At approximately 4:30 p.m. MT, some Lumen customers were affected by a vendor partner event that impacted 911 services in AZ, CO, NC, ND, MN, SD, and UT,” the statement reads. “Service was restored in less than an hour and all 911 traffic is routing properly at this time. The vendor partner is in the process of investigating the event.”

It may be no accident that both of these companies are now operating under new names, as this would hardly be the first time a problem between the two of them has disrupted 911 access for a large number of Americans.

In 2019, Intrado/West and CenturyLink agreed to pay $575,000 to settle an investigation by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) into an Aug. 2018 outage that lasted 65 minutes. The FCC found that incident was the result of a West Safety technician bungling a configuration change to the company’s 911 routing network.

On April 6, 2014, some 11 million people across the United States were disconnected from 911 services for eight hours thanks to an “entirely preventable” software error tied to Intrado’s systems. The incident affected 81 call dispatch centers, rendering emergency services inoperable in all of Washington and parts of North Carolina, South Carolina, Pennsylvania, California, Minnesota and Florida.

According to a 2014 Washington Post story about a subsequent investigation and report released by the FCC, that issue involved a problem with the way Intrado’s automated system assigns a unique identifying code to each incoming call before passing it on to the appropriate “public safety answering point,” or PSAP.

“On April 9, the software responsible for assigning the codes maxed out at a pre-set limit,” The Post explained. “The counter literally stopped counting at 40 million calls. As a result, the routing system stopped accepting new calls, leading to a bottleneck and a series of cascading failures elsewhere in the 911 infrastructure.”

Compounding the length of the 2014 outage, the FCC found, was that the Intrado server responsible for categorizing and keeping track of service interruptions classified them as “low level” incidents that were never flagged for manual review by human beings.

The FCC ultimately fined Intrado and CenturyLink $17.4 million for the multi-state 2014 outage. An FCC spokesperson declined to comment on Monday’s outage, but said the agency was investigating the incident.

Using virtualization to isolate risky applications and other endpoint threats

More and more security professionals are realizing that it’s impossible to fully secure a Windows machine – with all its legacy components and millions of potentially vulnerable lines of code – from within the OS. With attacks becoming more sophisticated than ever, hypervisor-based security, from below the OS, becomes a necessity.

Unlike modern OS kernels, hypervisors are designed for a very specific task. Their code is usually very small, well-reviewed and tested, making them very hard to exploit. Because of that, the world trusts modern hypervisors to run servers, containers, and other workloads in the cloud, which sometimes run side-by-side on the same physical server with complete separation and isolation. Because of that, companies are leveraging the same trusted technology to bring hardware-enforced isolation to the endpoint.

Microsoft Defender Application Guard

Microsoft Defender Application Guard (previously known as Windows Defender Application Guard, or just WDAG), brings hypervisor-based isolation to Microsoft Edge and Microsoft Office applications.

It allows administrators to apply policies that force untrusted web sites and documents to be opened in isolated Hyper-V containers, completely separating potential malware from the host OS. Malware running in such containers won’t be able to access and exfiltrate sensitive files such as corporate documents or the users’ corporate credentials, cookies, or tokens.

With Application Guard for Edge, when a user opens a web site that was not added to the allow-list, he is automatically redirected to a new isolated instance of Edge, continuing the session there. This isolated instance of Edge provides another, much stronger, sandboxing layer to cope with web threats. If allowed by the administrator, files downloaded during that session can be accessed later from the host OS.

isolate risky applications

With Application Guard for Office, when a user opens an unknown document, maybe downloaded from the internet or opened as an email attachment, the document is automatically opened in an isolated instance of Office.

Until now, such documents would be opened in “protected view”, a special mode that eliminates the threat from scripts and macros by disabling embedded code execution. Unfortunately, this mode sometimes breaks legit files, such as spreadsheets that contain harmless macros. It also prevents users from editing documents.

Many users blindly disable the “protected view” mode to enable editing, thereby allowing malware to execute on the device. With Application Guard for Office, users don’t compromise security (the malware is trapped inside the isolated container) nor productivity )the document is fully functional and editable inside the container).

In both cases, the container is spawned instantly, with minimal CPU, memory, and disk footprints. Unlike traditional virtual machines, IT administrators don’t need to manage the underlying OS inside the container. Instead, it’s built out of existing Windows system binaries that remain patched as long as the host OS is up to date. Microsoft has also introduced new virtual GPU capabilities, allowing software running inside the container to be hardware-GPU accelerated. With all these optimizations, Edge and Office running inside the container feel fast and responsive, almost as if they were running without an additional virtualization layer.

The missing compatibility

While Application Guard works well with Edge and Office, it doesn’t support other applications. Edge will always be the browser running inside the container. That means, for example, no Google accounts synchronization, something that many users probably want.

What about downloaded applications? Applications are not allowed to run inside the container. (The container hardening contains some WDAC policies that allow only specific apps to execute.) That means that users can execute those potentially malicious applications on the host OS only.

Administrators who don’t allow unknown apps on the host OS might reduce users’ productivity and increase frustration. This is probably more prominent today, with so many people working from home and using a new wave of modern collaboration tools and video conferencing applications.

Users who are invited to external meetings sometimes need to download and run a client that may be blocked by the organization on the host OS. Unfortunately, it’s not possible to run the client inside the container either, and the users need to look for other solutions.

And what about non-Office documents? Though Office documents are protected, non-Office documents aren’t. Users sometimes use various other applications to create and edit documents, such as Adobe Acrobat and Photoshop, Autodesk AutoCAD, and many others. Application Guard won’t help to protect the host OS from such documents that are received over email or downloaded from the internet.

Even with Office alone, there might be problems. Many organizations use Office add-ons to customize and streamline the end-user experience. These add-ons may integrate with other local or online applications to provide additional functionality. As Application Guard runs a vanilla Office without any customizations, these add-ons won’t be able to run inside the container.

The missing manageability

Configuring Application Guard is not easy. First, while Application Guard for Edge technically works on both Windows Pro and Windows Enterprise, only on Windows Enterprise is it possible to configure it to kick-in automatically for untrusted websites. For non-technical users, that makes Application Guard almost useless in the eyes of their IT administrators, as those users have to launch it manually every time they consider a website to be untrusted. That’s a lot of room for human error. Even if all the devices are running Windows Enterprise, it’s not a walk in the park for administrators.

For the networking isolation configuration, administrators have to provide a manual list of comma-separated IPs and domain names. It’s not possible to integrate with your already fully configured web-proxy. It’s also not possible to integrate with category-based filtering systems that you might also have. Aside from the additional system to manage, there is no convenient UI or advanced capabilities (such as automatic filtering based on categories) to use. To make it work with Chrome or Firefox, administrators also need to perform additional configurations, such as delivering browser extensions.

This is not a turnkey solution for administrators and it requires messing with multiple configurations and GPOs until it works.
In addition, other management capabilities are very limited. For example, while admins can define whether clipboard operations (copy+paste) are allowed between the host and the container, it’s not possible to allow these operations only one way and not the other. It’s also not possible to allow certain content types such as text and images, while blocking others, such as binary files.
OS customizations and additional software bundlings such as Edge extensions and Office add-ins are not available either.

While Office files are opened automatically in Application Guard, other file types aren’t. Administrators that would like to use Edge as a secure and isolated PDF viewer, for example, can’t configure that.

The missing security

As stated before, Application Guard doesn’t protect against malicious files that were mistakenly categorized to be safe by the user. The user might securely download a malicious file on his isolated Edge but then choose to execute it on the host OS. He might also mistakenly categorize an untrusted document as a corporate one, to have it opened on the host OS. Malware could easily infect the host due to user errors.

Another potential threat comes from the networking side. While malware getting into the container is isolated in some aspects such as memory (it can’t inject itself into processes running on the host) and filesystem (it can’t replace files on the host with infected copies), it’s not fully isolated on the networking side.

Application Guard containers leverage the Windows Internet Connection Sharing (ICS) feature, to fully share networking with the host. That means that malware running inside the container might be able to attack some sensitive corporate resources that are accessible by the host (e.g., databases and data centers) by exploiting network vulnerabilities.

While Application Guard tries to isolate web and document threats, it doesn’t provide isolation in other areas. As mentioned before, Application Guard can’t isolate non-Microsoft applications that the organization chooses to use but not trust. Video conferencing applications, for example, have been exploited in the past and usually don’t require access to corporate data – it’s much safer to execute these in an isolated container.

External device handling is another risky area. Think of CVE-2016-0133, which allowed attackers to execute malicious code in the Windows kernel simply by plugging a USB thumb drive into the victim’s laptop. Isolating unknown USB devices can stop such attacks.

The missing holistic solution

Wouldn’t it be great if users could easily open any risky document in an isolated environment, e.g., through a context menu? Or if administrators could configure any risky website, document, or application to be automatically transferred and opened in an isolated environment? And maybe also to have corporate websites to be automatically opened back on the host OS, to avoid mixing sensitive information and corporate credentials with non-corporate work?

How about automatically attaching risky USB devices to the container, e.g., personal thumb drives, to reduce chances of infecting the host OS? And what if all that could be easy for administrators to deploy and manage, as a turn-key solution in the cloud?

Microsoft: Attackers Exploiting ‘ZeroLogon’ Windows Flaw

Microsoft warned on Wednesday that malicious hackers are exploiting a particularly dangerous flaw in Windows Server systems that could be used to give attackers the keys to the kingdom inside a vulnerable corporate network. Microsoft’s warning comes just days after the U.S. Department of Homeland Security issued an emergency directive instructing all federal agencies to patch the vulnerability by Sept. 21 at the latest.

DHS’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Agency (CISA) said in the directive that it expected imminent exploitation of the flaw — CVE-2020-1472 and dubbed “ZeroLogon” — because exploit code which can be used to take advantage of it was circulating online.

Last night, Microsoft’s Security Intelligence unit tweeted that the company is “tracking threat actor activity using exploits for the CVE-2020-1472 Netlogon vulnerability.”

“We have observed attacks where public exploits have been incorporated into attacker playbooks,” Microsoft said. “We strongly recommend customers to immediately apply security updates.”

Microsoft released a patch for the vulnerability in August, but it is not uncommon for businesses to delay deploying updates for days or weeks while testing to ensure the fixes do not interfere with or disrupt specific applications and software.

CVE-2020-1472 earned Microsoft’s most-dire “critical” severity rating, meaning attackers can exploit it with little or no help from users. The flaw is present in most supported versions of Windows Server, from Server 2008 through Server 2019.

The vulnerability could let an unauthenticated attacker gain administrative access to a Windows domain controller and run an application of their choosing. A domain controller is a server that responds to security authentication requests in a Windows environment, and a compromised domain controller can give attackers the keys to the kingdom inside a corporate network.

Scott Caveza, research engineering manager at security firm Tenable, said several samples of malicious .NET executables with the filename ‘SharpZeroLogon.exe’ have been uploaded to VirusTotal, a service owned by Google that scans suspicious files against dozens of antivirus products.

“Given the flaw is easily exploitable and would allow an attacker to completely take over a Windows domain, it should come as no surprise that we’re seeing attacks in the wild,” Caveza said. “Administrators should prioritize patching this flaw as soon as possible. Based on the rapid speed of exploitation already, we anticipate this flaw will be a popular choice amongst attackers and integrated into malicious campaigns.”

Dataguise integrates with Microsoft Information Protection to help orgs minimize sensitive data risk

Dataguise announced a new product integration with Microsoft Information Protection (MIP), a cloud-based solution that enables organizations to classify and protect documents, emails, and other sensitive data by applying labels.

The company also announced its membership in the Microsoft Intelligent Security Association (MISA), an ecosystem of partners that have integrated their solutions with Microsoft to help shared customers better protect against cybersecurity threats.

For organizations using the power and efficiency of Microsoft Azure, Dataguise can enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of data protection processes through integrated, automated sensitive data discovery.

“There are a lot of different ways organizations can protect sensitive data, but accurate, thorough discovery is always the first step—and it can be tough to get it right,” said JT Sison, Vice President Marketing and Business Development at Dataguise.

“Sensitive data is hard to keep track of and even harder to find. If you miss or even mislabel data, you’re wasting your investments in data protection. As a Microsoft partner since 2015 and new member of the Microsoft Intelligent Security Association (MISA), Dataguise is committed to helping Microsoft customers minimize risk and maximize ROI in their information security efforts.”

Dataguise can automatically discover structured, semi-structured, and unstructured personal information and other sensitive data in on-premises and cloud-based data stores and tag the data with MIP-readable labels.

Once identified and labeled, the data can be protected accordingly—using encryption, for example—by Microsoft Information Protection, Dataguise, or another third-party solution that supports MIP labels.

In addition to supporting MIP, Dataguise can discover sensitive data in Blob Storage, Azure Data Lake Storage Gen 1 and Gen 2, Microsoft SQL server, and HD Insights.

“The Microsoft Intelligent Security Association has grown into a vibrant ecosystem comprised of the most reliable and trusted security software vendors across the globe.

“Our members, like Dataguise, share Microsoft’s commitment to collaboration within the cybersecurity community to improve our customers’ ability to predict, detect, and respond to security threats faster,” said Rani Lofstrom, Senior Product Marketing Manager, Microsoft Security.

Microsoft open-sources tool that enables continuous developer-driven fuzzing

Microsoft has open-sourced OneFuzz, its own internal continuous developer-driven fuzzing platform, allowing developers around the world to receive fuzz testing results directly from their build system.

continuous developer-driven fuzzing

Fuzzing is an automated software testing technique that involves entering random, unexpected, malformed and/or invalid data into a computer program. The goal is to reveal exceptions (e.g., crashes, memory leaks, etc.) and unexpected behaviors that could affect the program’s security and performance.

Azure-powered continuous developer-driven fuzzing

Project OneFuzz is an extensible, self-hosted Fuzzing-As-A-Service platform for Azure that aggregates several existing fuzzers and (through automation) bakes in crash detection, coverage tracking and input harnessing.

The tool is used by Microsoft’s internal teams to strengthen the security development of Windows, Microsoft Edge, and other software products.

“Traditionally, fuzz testing has been a double-edged sword for developers: mandated by the software-development lifecycle, highly effective in finding actionable flaws, yet very complicated to harness, execute, and extract information from,” Microsoft Security principal security software engineering lead Justin Campbell and senior director for special projects management Mike Walker noted.

“That complexity required dedicated security engineering teams to build and operate fuzz testing capabilities making it very useful but expensive. Enabling developers to perform fuzz testing shifts the discovery of vulnerabilities to earlier in the development lifecycle and simultaneously frees security engineering teams to pursue proactive work.”

The tool’s capabilities

As the two explained, OneFuzz will allow developers to launch fuzz jobs – ranging in size from a few virtual machines to thousands of cores – with a single command line baked into the build system.

The tool’s features include:

  • Composable fuzzing workflows: Open source allows users to onboard their own fuzzers, swap instrumentation, and manage seed inputs.
  • Built-in ensemble fuzzing: By default, fuzzers work as a team to share strengths, swapping inputs of interest between fuzzing technologies.
  • Programmatic triage and result deduplication: It provides unique flaw cases that always reproduce.
  • On-demand live-debugging of found crashes: It lets users summon a live debugging session on-demand or from their build system.
  • Transparent design that allows introspection into every stage.
  • Detailed telemetry: Easy monitoring of all fuzzing
  • Multi-platform by design: Fuzzing can be performed on Windows and varios Linux OSes, by using one’s own OS build, kernel, or nested hypervisor.
  • Crash reporting notification callbacks: Currently supporting Azure DevOps Work Items and Microsoft Teams messages
  • Code Coverage KPIs: Users can monitor their progress and motivate testing using code coverage as key metric.

OneFuzz will be available to the rest of the world in a few days (via GitHub). Microsoft will continue to update and expand it with contributions from the company’s various teams, and welcomes contributions and suggestions from the wider open-source community.