Operator‑billed 5G connections revenue to reach $357 billion by 2025

Operator‑billed revenue from 5G connections will reach $357 billion by 2025, rising from $5 billion in 2020, its first full year of commercial service, according to Juniper Research.

5G connections revenue

By 2025, 5G revenue is anticipated to represent 44% of global operator‑billed revenue owing to rapid migration of 4G mobile subscribers to 5G networks and new business use cases enabled by 5G technology.

However, the study identified 5G networks roll-outs as highly resilient to the COVID-19 pandemic. It found that supply chain disruptions caused by the initial pandemic period have been mitigated through modified physical roll-out procedures, in order to maintain the momentum of hardware deployments.

5G connections to generate 250% more revenue than average cellular connection

The study found that 5G uptake had surpassed initial expectations, predicting total 5G connections will surpass 1.5 billion by 2025. It also forecast that the average 5G connection will generate 250% more revenue than an average cellular connection by 2025.

To secure a return on investment into new services, such as uRLLC (Ultra-Reliable Low-Latency Communication) and network slicing, enabled by 5G, operators will apply this premium pricing for 5G connections.

However, these services alongside the high-bandwidth capabilities of 5G will create data-intensive use cases that lead to a 270% growth in data traffic generated by all cellular connections over the next five years.

Networks must increase virtualisation to handle 5G data traffic

Operators must use future launches of standalone 5G network as an opportunity to further increase virtualisation in core networks. Failure to develop 5G network architectures that handle increasing traffic will lead to reduced network functionality, inevitably leading to a diminished value proposition of its 5G network amongst end users.

Research author Sam Barker remarked: “Operators will compete on 5G capabilities, in terms of bandwidth and latency. A lesser 5G offering will lead to user churn to competing networks and missed opportunities in operators’ fastest-growing revenue stream.”

The biggest cyber threats organizations deal with today

Microsoft has released a new report outlining enterprise cyberattack trends in the past year (July 2019 – June 2020) and offering advice on how organizations can protect themselves.

Based on over 8 trillion daily security signals and observations from the company’s security and threat intelligence experts, the Microsoft Digital Defense Report 2020 draws a distinction between attacks mounted by cybercriminals and those by nation-state attackers.

The cybercrime threat

In the past year, cybercriminals:

  • Were quick to exploit the fear and uncertainty associated with COVID-19 as a lure in phishing emails, and the popularity of some SaaS offerings and other services
  • Exploited the lack of basic security hygiene and well-known vulnerabilities to gain access to enterprise systems and networks
  • Exploited supply chain (in)security by hitting vulnerable third-party services, open source software and IoT devices and using them as a way into the target organization

More often than not, phishing emails impersonate a well-known service such as Office 365 (Microsoft), Zoom, Amazon or Apple, in an attempt to harvest login credentials.

“While credential phishing and BEC continue to be the dominant variations, we also see attacks on a user’s identity and credential being attempted via password reuse and password spray attacks using legacy email protocols such as IMAP and SMTP,” Microsoft noted.

The attackers’ reason for exploiting these legacy authentication protocols is simple: they don’t support multi-factor authentication (MFA). Microsoft advises on enabling MFA and disabling legacy authentication.

Cybercriminals are also:

  • Increasingly use cloud services and compromised email and web hosting infrastructures to orchestrate phishing campaigns
  • Rapidly changing campaigns (sending domains, email addresses, content templates, and URL domains)
  • Constantly changing and evolving payload delivery mechanisms (poisoned search results, custom 404 pages hosting phishing payloads, etc.)

One of the biggest and most disruptive cybercrime threat in the past year was ransomware – particularly “human-operated” ransomware wielded by gangs that target ogranizations they believe will part with big sums if affected.

These gangs sweep the internet for easy entry points or use commodity malware to gain access to company networks and change ransomware payloads and attack tools depending on the “terrain” they landed in (and to avoid attribution).

“Ransomware criminals are intimately familiar with systems management concepts and the struggles IT departments face. Attack patterns demonstrate that cybercriminals know when there will be change freezes, such as holidays, that will impact an organization’s ability to make changes (such as patching) to harden their networks,” Microsoft explained.

“They’re aware of when there are business needs that will make businesses more willing to pay ransoms than take downtime, such as during billing cycles in the health, finance, and legal industries. Targeting networks where critical work was needed during the COVID-19 pandemic, and also specifically attacking remote access devices during a time when unprecedented numbers of people were working remotely, are examples of this level of knowledge.”

Some of them have even shortened their in-network dwell time before deploying the ransomware, going from initial entry to ransoming the entire network in less than 45 minutes.

Gerrit Lansing, Field CTO, Stealthbits, commented that the speed at which a targeted ransomware attack can happen is really determined by one thing: how quickly an adversary can compromise administrative privileges in Microsoft Active Directory.

“Going from initial infiltration to total ownership of Active Directory can be a matter of seconds. Once these privileges are compromised, an adversary’s ability to deploy ransomware to all machines joined to Active Directory is unfettered, which explains how an adversary can go from initial infiltration to total ransomware infection in such a short period of time,” he noted.

Finally, to counter the threat of supply chain insecurity, Microsoft advises companiessupply to:

  • Vet their service providers thoroughly
  • Use systems to automatically identify open source software components and vulnerabilities in them
  • Map IoT assets, apply security policies to reduce the attack surface, and to use a different network for IoT devices and be familiar with all exposed interfaces

enterprise cyberattack trends 2020

Nation-state threats

The company has been following and mapping the activities of a number of nation-state actors and has found that – based on the nation state notifications they deliver to their customers – the attackers’ primary targets are not in the critical infrastructure sectors.

Instead, the top targeted industry sectors are non-governmental organizations (advocacy groups, human rights organizations, nonprofit organizations, etc.) and professional services (consulting firms and contractors):

enterprise cyberattack trends 2020

Microsoft found the most common attack techniques used by nation-state actors in the past year are reconnaissance, credential harvesting, malware, and VPN exploits. Web shell-based attacks are also on the rise.

The report delineates steps organizations can take to counter each of these threats as well as to improve their security and the security of their remote workforce.

“Given the leap in attack sophistication in the past year, it is more important than ever that we take steps to establish new rules of the road for cyberspace; that all organizations, whether government agencies or businesses, invest in people and technology to help stop attacks; and that people focus on the basics, including regular application of security updates, comprehensive backup policies, and, especially, enabling MFA. Our data shows that enabling MFA would alone have prevented the vast majority of successful attacks,” the Microsoft Security Team concluded.

Surge in cyber attacks targeting open source software projects

There has been a massive 430% surge in next generation cyber attacks aimed at actively infiltrating open source software supply chains, Sonatype has found.

attacks open source

Rise of next-gen software supply chain attacks

According to the report, 929 next generation software supply chain attacks were recorded from July 2019 through May 2020. By comparison 216 such attacks were recorded in the four years between February 2015 and June 2019.

The difference between “next generation” and “legacy” software supply chain attacks is simple but important: next generation attacks like ​Octopus Scanner​ and ​electron-native-notify​ are strategic and involve bad actors intentionally targeting and surreptitiously compromising “upstream” open source projects so they can subsequently exploit vulnerabilities when they inevitably flow “downstream” into the wild.

Conversely, legacy software supply chain attacks like ​Equifax​ are tactical and involve bad actors waiting for new zero day vulnerabilities to be publicly disclosed and then racing to take advantage in the wild before others can remediate.

“Following the notorious Equifax breach of 2017, enterprises significantly ramped investments to prevent similar attacks on open source software supply chains,” said Wayne Jackson, CEO at Sonatype.

“Our research shows that commercial engineering teams are getting faster in their ability to respond to new zero day vulnerabilities. Therefore, it should come as no surprise that next generation supply chain attacks have increased 430% as adversaries are shifting their activities ‘upstream’ where they can infect a single open source component that has the potential to be distributed ‘downstream” where it can be strategically and covertly exploited.”

Speed remains critical when responding to legacy software supply chain attacks

According to the report, enterprise software development teams differ in their response times to vulnerabilities in open source software components:

  • 47% of organizations ​became aware of new open source vulnerabilities after a week, and
  • 51% of organizations​ took more than a week to remediate the open source vulnerabilities

The researchers discovered that not all organizations prioritize improved risk management practices at the expense of developer productivity. This year’s report reveals that high performing development teams are ​26x faster at detecting and remediating open source vulnerabilities,​ and ​deploy changes to code 15x more frequently​ than their peers.

High performers are also:

  • 59% more likely​ to be using automated software composition analysis (SCA) to detect and remediate known vulnerable OSS components across the SDLC
  • 51% more likely​ to centrally maintain a software bill of materials (SBOMs) for applications
  • 4.9x more likely​ to successfully update dependencies and fix vulnerabilities without breakage
  • 33x more likely​ to be confident that OSS dependencies are secure (i.e., no known vulnerabilities)

Additional findings

  • 1.5 trillion component download requests​ projected in 2020 across all major open source ecosystems
  • 10% of java OSS component downloads ​by developers​ ​had known security vulnerabilities
  • 11% of open source components​ developers build into their applications are known vulnerable, with 38 vulnerabilities discovered on average
  • 40% of npm packages ​contain dependencies with known vulnerabilities​
  • New open source zero-day vulnerabilities are exploited in the wild within​ 3 days of public disclosure​
  • The average enterprise sources code from 3,500 OSS projects including over 11,000 component releases.

attacks open source

“We found that high performers are able to simultaneously achieve security and productivity objectives,” said Gene Kim, DevOps researcher and author of The Unicorn Project. “It’s fantastic to gain a better understanding of the principles and practices of how this is achieved, as well as their measurable outcomes.”

“It was really exciting to find so much evidence that this much-discussed tradeoff between security and productivity is really a false dichotomy. With the right culture, workflow, and tools development teams can achieve great security and compliance outcomes together with class-leading productivity,” said Dr. Stephen Magill, Principal Scientist at Galois & CEO of MuseDev.

760+ malicious packages found typosquatting on RubyGems

Researchers have discovered over 760 malicious Ruby packages (aka “gems”) typosquatting on RubyGems, the Ruby community’s gem repository / hosting service.

typosquatting RubyGems

The discovery

ReversingLabs analysts wanted to see how widespread the practice of package typosquatting is within RubyGems.

The practice refers to the intentional use of package names very similar to those of popular packages (e.g., atlas-client instead of atlas_client), with the ostensible intention of tricking users into executing them and, therefore, unknowingly running malicious code.

“We crafted a list of the most popular gems to use as a baseline. On a weekly basis, we collected gems that were newly pushed to the RubyGems repository. If we detected a new gem with a similar name to any of the baseline list gems, we flagged it as interesting for analysis,” threat analyst Tomislav Maljić explained.

After analyzing them, they found that all contained an executable file with the same filename and the PNG extension, which they assume was used to masquerade the executable as an image file. The file was also located on the same path in every gem.

The packages also contained a gemspec file – a type of file that contains basic metadata about the gem but can also include information about extensions – which runs an extension that checks the target platform and if it’s Windows, it renames the PNG file into an EXE file and executes it.

OPIS

A Ruby script is then run that creates an additional script, which in its turn:

  • Sreates an autorun registry key to assure persistence
  • Captures the user’s clipboard data in an infinite loop
  • Checks whether the data matches the format of a cryptocurrency wallet address and, if it does, replaces it with the address with an attacker-controlled one.

Its goal is to redirect all potential cryptocurrency transactions to the attacker’s wallet.

Repeated attacks

All the malicious gems were published by two accounts, which the researchers believe were created by the same threat actor. In fact, they believe that the same threat actor mounted at least two previous malicious campaigns against the RubyGems repository.

“The same file path ‘/ext/trellislike/unflaming/waffling/’ was used in all the attacks. Likewise, the malicious intent was related to cryptomining in all cases,” Maljić explained their reasoning.

ReversingLabs provided a list of the affected packages, which have since been removed from RubyGems. The two accounts created by the threat actor have been suspended.

This is not the first time threat actors tried to plant malicious packages in software repositories for popular programming languages. ReversingLabs previously flagged a batch of malicious Python libraries hosted on Python Package Index (PyPI), and developer Jussi Koljonen found that several older versions of popular Ruby packages on RubyGems were trojanized to steal information and mine cryptocurrency.

Third-party risk is broken, businesses unprepared for supply chain disruptions

Many companies are not dedicating proper resources to assess third-party risks, and those that are still lack confidence in their programs, according to Prevalent.

supply chain disruptions

Supply chain disruptions

As a result, there are real consequences including loss of revenue, loss of productivity, and loss of reputation – all of which can jeopardize resiliency and are amplified given today’s supply chain concerns related to COVID-19.

“Organizations are starting to ask the question about what happens to them if their supply chain partners go out of business. Sadly, most companies don’t have the risk visibility into their supply chains to answer that question,” stated Brenda Ferraro, VP of third-party risk at Prevalent.

“How can they expect to adequately manage their own risk without understanding the risks vendors and partners pose?”

Key findings from the report

  • Lack of confidence in the program inhibits results: 54% of organizations have some meaningful experience in conducting third-party risk assessments, yet only 10% are extremely confident in their programs.
  • Significant consequences: 76% of respondents said that they experienced one or more issues that impacted vendor performance – resulting in a loss of productivity (39%), monetary damages (28%) and a loss of reputation (25%).
  • Unsatisfactory number of assessments: 66% of respondents say they should be assessing more than three-fourths of their top tier vendors but aren’t doing so.
  • Costs, resources and lack of process are inhibitors to success: Lack of resources (74%), cost (39%) and insufficient processes (32%) are keeping respondents from assessing all their top-tier vendors.
  • No one seems happy with their existing toolset: Satisfaction levels among existing tools hovers in the 50% range, and weighted average of satisfaction caps out at 3.8/5.0. GRC tools have an especially long way to go with a 41% satisfaction rate.

supply chain disruptions

Third-party risk management program

Growing and maturing an adaptable and agile third-party risk management program that is resilient in times of crisis doesn’t have to be a complex and time-consuming process. The report concludes with five recommendations to jump start vendor risk activities:

  • Develop a programmatic process
  • Build a cross-functional team that extends beyond risk and compliance
  • Be comprehensive without being complex
  • Maintain options for assessment collection and analysis for agility
  • Complement your decision-making with risk-based intelligence

Kwampirs threat actor continues to breach transnational healthcare orgs

The Kwampirs (aka Orangeworm) attack group continues to target global healthcare entities in this time of crisis, the FBI has warned.

Kwampirs

“Targeted entities range from major transnational healthcare companies to local hospital organizations,” the Bureau noted.

“The FBI assesses Kwampirs actors gained access to a large number of global hospitals through vendor software supply chain and hardware products. Infected software supply chain vendors included products used to manage industrial control system (ICS) assets in hospitals.”

Kwampirs

This is the third FBI private industry notification since the beginning of the year about the group’s activities and the modular Kwampirs RAT it uses.

According to the alert:

  • The attack group first establishes a broad and persistent presence on the targeted network and then delivers and executes the Kwampir RAT and other malicious payloads
  • Kwampirs actors have successfully gained and sustained persistent presence on victim networks for a time period ranging from three to 36 months
  • The Kwampir RAT is modular and, depending on the target, different modules are dropped. But it seems that the threat actors main goal is cyber espionage
  • Significant intrusion vectors include: lateral movement between company networks during mergers and acquisitions; malware being passed between entities through shared resources and internet facing resources during the software co-development process; and software supply chain vendors installing infected devices on the customer/corporate LAN or customer/corporate cloud infrastructure.

“Kwampirs campaign actors have targeted companies in the imaging industry, to include networked scanner and copier-type devices, with domain access to customer networks. The FBI assesses these imaging vendors are targeted to gain access to customer networks, including remote or cloud management access, which could permit lateral CNE movement within victim networks,” the FBI added.

While the Kwampirs/Orangeworm threat actors is considered to be an APT (Advanced Persistent Threat), it is currently unknown whether they are state-backed.

What is known is that they don’t go after PII, payment card data, and are not interested in destroying or encrypting data for ransom – though, according to the FBI, several code-based similarities exist between the Kwampirs RAT and the Shamoon/Disstrack wiper malware.

The group also doesn’t limit their targeting to healthcare and software supply chain organizations. To a lesser extent, they go after companies in the energy and engineering industry as well as financial institutions and prominent law firms, across the United States, Europe, Asia, and the Middle East.

Defense and post-infection remediation

The notice delivers best practices for network security and defense to be incorporated before infection, recommended post-infection actions and identifies residual Kwampirs RAT host artifacts that can help companies to determine if they were a victim.

Indicators of compromise and YARA rules to identify Kwampirs malware have been provided in separate documents.

SANS ISC handler (and Dean of Research at the SANS Technology Institute Twitter) Johannes Ullrich notes that Kwampirs will likely enter an organization’s network undetected as part of a software update from a trusted vendor.

“Anti-malware solutions will detect past versions. But do not put too much trust in anti-malware to detect the next version that is likely tailored to your organization,” he added, and offered helpful advice for writing abstracted detection signatures that might come in handy.

While not recently updated, the MITRE ATT&CK entry for the Kwampirs malware may also be helpful. For more technical details about the malware, you might want to check out ReversingLabs’s recent analysis.

A massive increase in eCrime behavior can easily disrupt business operations

During 2019, financially motivated cybercrime activity occurred on a nearly continuous basis, according to a CrowdStrike report.

eCrime behavior

There was an increase in incidents of ransomware, maturation of the tactics used, and increasing ransom demands from eCrime actors. Increasingly these actors have begun conducting data exfiltration, enabling the weaponization of sensitive data through threats of leaking embarrassing or proprietary information.

Moving beyond eCrime, nation-state adversaries continued unabated throughout 2019, targeting a wide range of industries. Another key trend in this year’s report is the telecommunications industry being targeted with increased frequency by threat actors, such as China and DPRK.

Various nations, particularly China, have interest in targeting this sector to steal intellectual property and competitive intelligence.

Pursuing the 1-10-60 rule

Combatting threats from sophisticated nation-state and eCrime adversaries requires a mature process that can prevent, detect and respond to threats with speed and agility. Organizations should pursue the “1-10-60 rule” in order to effectively thwart cyberthreats.

1-10-60 guidelines are the following: detect intrusions in under one minute; investigate in 10 minutes; contain and eliminate the adversary in 60 minutes. Organizations that meet this benchmark are much more likely to eradicate the adversary before an attack spreads from its initial entry point, ultimately minimizing organizational impact.

“2019 brought an onslaught of new techniques from nation-state actors and an increasingly complex eCrime underground filled with brazen tactics and massive increases in targeted ransomware demands. As such, modern security teams must employ technologies to detect, investigate and remediate incidents faster with swift preemptive countermeasures, such as threat intelligence, and follow the 1-10-60 rule,” said Adam Meyers, vice president of Intelligence at CrowdStrike.

eCrime behavior

Report highlights

  • The trend toward malware-free tactics accelerated, with malware-free attacks surpassing the volume of malware attacks. In 2019, 51% of attacks used malware-free techniques compared to 40% using malware-free techniques in 2018, underscoring the need to advance beyond traditional AV solutions.
  • China continues to focus many operations on supply chain compromises, demonstrating the nation-state’s continued use of this tactic to identify and infect multiple victims. Other targeting of key U.S. industries deemed vital to China’s strategic interests — including clean energy, healthcare, biotechnology, and pharmaceuticals — is also likely to continue.
  • The industries at the top of the target list for enterprise ransomware (Big Game Hunting) observed were local governments and municipalities, academic institutions, the technology sector, healthcare, manufacturing, financial services and media companies.
  • In addition to supporting currency generation, DPRK’s targeting of cryptocurrency exchanges could support espionage-oriented efforts designed to collect information on users or cryptocurrency operations and systems. In addition, it is suspected that DPRK has also been developing its own cryptocurrency to further circumvent sanctions.

“This year’s report indicates a massive increase in eCrime behavior can easily disrupt business operations, with criminals employing tactics to leave organizations inoperable for large periods of time. It’s imperative that modern organizations employ a sophisticated security strategy that includes better detection and response and 24/7/365 managed threat hunting to pinpoint incidents and mitigate risks,” said Jennifer Ayers, vice president of OverWatch at CrowdStrike.

Tiny cryptographic ID chip can help combat hardware counterfeiting

To combat supply chain counterfeiting, which can cost companies billions of dollars annually, MIT researchers have invented a cryptographic ID tag that’s small enough to fit on virtually any product and verify its authenticity.

supply chain counterfeiting

A 2018 report from the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development estimates about $2 trillion worth of counterfeit goods will be sold worldwide in 2020. That’s bad news for consumers and companies that order parts from different sources worldwide to build products. Counterfeiters tend to use complex routes that include many checkpoints, making it challenging to verifying their origins and authenticity. Consequently, companies can end up with imitation parts.

Wireless ID tags are becoming increasingly popular for authenticating assets as they change hands at each checkpoint. But these tags come with various size, cost, energy, and security tradeoffs that limit their potential.

Popular radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags, for instance, are too large to fit on tiny objects such as medical and industrial components, automotive parts, or silicon chips. RFID tags also contain no tough security measures.

Some tags are built with encryption schemes to protect against cloning and ward off hackers, but they’re large and power hungry. Shrinking the tags means giving up both the antenna package — which enables radio-frequency communication — and the ability to run strong encryption.

In a paper the researchers presented at the IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference, they describe an ID chip that navigates all those tradeoffs. It’s millimeter-sized and runs on relatively low levels of power supplied by photovoltaic diodes.

It also transmits data at far ranges, using a power-free “backscatter” technique that operates at a frequency hundreds of times higher than RFIDs. Algorithm optimization techniques also enable the chip to run a popular cryptography scheme that guarantees secure communications using extremely low energy.

“We call it the ‘tag of everything.’ And everything should mean everything,” says co-author Ruonan Han, an associate professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and head of the Terahertz Integrated Electronics Group in the Microsystems Technology Laboratories (MTL).

“If I want to track the logistics of, say, a single bolt or tooth implant or silicon chip, current RFID tags don’t enable that. We built a low-cost, tiny chip without packaging, batteries, or other external components, that stores and transmits sensitive data.”

Joining Han on the paper are: graduate students Mohamed I. Ibrahim, Muhammad Ibrahim Wasiq Khan, and Chiraag S. Juvekar; former postdoc associate Wanyeong Jung; former postdoc Rabia Tugce Yazicigil; and Anantha P. Chandrakasan, who is the dean of the MIT School of Engineering and the Vannevar Bush Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.

Solving the problem of size

The work began as a means of creating better RFID tags. The team wanted to do away with packaging, which makes the tags bulky and increases manufacturing cost.

They also wanted communication in the high terahertz frequency between microwave and infrared radiation — around 100 gigahertz and 10 terahertz — that enables chip integration of an antenna array and wireless communications at greater reader distances.

Finally, they wanted cryptographic protocols because RFID tags can be scanned by essentially any reader and transmit their data indiscriminately.

But including all those functions would normally require building a fairly large chip. Instead, the researchers came up with “a pretty big system integration,” Ibrahim says, that enabled putting everything on a monolithic — meaning, not layered — silicon chip that was only about 1.6 square millimeters.

One innovation is an array of small antennas that transmit data back and forth via backscattering between the tag and reader. Backscatter, used commonly in RFID technologies, happens when a tag reflects an input signal back to a reader with slight modulations that correspond to data transmitted.

In the researchers’ system, the antennas use some signal splitting and mixing techniques to backscatter signals in the terahertz range. Those signals first connect with the reader and then send data for encryption.

Implemented into the antenna array is a “beam steering” function, where the antennas focus signals toward a reader, making them more efficient, increasing signal strength and range, and reducing interference. This is the first demonstration of beam steering by a backscattering tag, according to the researchers.

Tiny holes in the antennas allow light from the reader to pass through to photodiodes underneath that convert the light into about 1 volt of electricity. That powers up the chip’s processor, which runs the chip’s “elliptic-curve-cryptography” (ECC) scheme.

ECC uses a combination of private keys (known only to a user) and public keys (disseminated widely) to keep communications private. In the researchers’ system, the tag uses a private key and a reader’s public key to identify itself only to valid readers. That means any eavesdropper who doesn’t possess the reader’s private key should not be able to identify which tag is part of the protocol by monitoring just the wireless link.

Optimizing the cryptographic code and hardware lets the scheme run on an energy-efficient and small processor, Yazicigil says. “It’s always a tradeoff,” she says. “If you tolerate a higher-power budget and larger size, you can include cryptography. But the challenge is having security in such a small tag with a low-power budget.”

Pushing the signal range limits

Currently, the signal range sits around 5 centimeters, which is considered a far-field range — and allows for convenient use of a portable tag scanner. Next, the researchers hope to “push the limits” of the range even further, Ibrahim says.

Eventually, they’d like many of the tags to ping one reader positioned somewhere far away in, say, a receiving room at a supply chain checkpoint. Many assets could then be verified rapidly.

“We think we can have a reader as a central hub that doesn’t have to come close to the tag, and all these chips can beam steer their signals to talk to that one reader,” Ibrahim says.

The researchers also hope to fully power the chip through the terahertz signals themselves, eliminating any need for photodiodes.

The chips are so small, easy to make, and inexpensive that they can also be embedded into larger silicon computer chips, which are especially popular targets for counterfeiting.

Free trojanized WordPress themes lead to widespread compromise of web servers

Over 20,000 web servers (and who knows how many websites) have been compromised via trojanized WordPress themes to deliver malware through malicious ads, Prevailion researchers have discovered.

trojanized WordPress themes

The compromised servers are located across the globe and more than a fifth of all compromised entities are small to medium sized businesses.

“This is most likely due to the fact that many lack the necessary funding or human capital to build a completely custom website, unlike larger, more established firms,” the company noted.

The scheme

The cybercriminals behind this scheme have been at it since late 2017 and they are not stopping.

They are taking advantage of the widespread use of the WordPress content management system, an increased demand for premium themes and victims’ lack of security awareness to get them to unknowingly compromise their own web servers.

To do that, they’ve set up as many as 30 websites that ostensibly offer thousands of free, pirated WordPress themes and plugins and hosted the trojanized themes and plugins on them – among the most popular ones were Ultimate Support Chat, WooCommerce product filter and Slider Revolution.

Oblivious victims download and install the trojanized packages, which drop malicious files that allow the criminals to gain full control over the web server. They can then add an administrative account, recover the web admin’s email account and WordPress password hash, and possibly recover the password from it. (If the admin used the same password for other accounts, it may even allow them to access so some corporate resources.)

The delivered loader, first and second stage malware do things like:

  • Establish communications with the C&C server
  • Download additional files from it
  • Add a persistent cookie to website visitors who came to the site from one of several search engines and add their IP address to a list
  • Collect information about the compromised machine

They also allow the criminals to add web links or keywords to existing or new web pages on the compromised domain (to raise the sites’ SEO profile), display ads on the visited webpage even if the end-user is using an ad-blocker, and deliver either legitimate or malicious ads via the advertising service Propeller Ads.

“In numerous cases, the advertisements were completely benign and would direct the end user to a legitimate service or website. In other cases however, we observed pop-up ads prompting the user to download potentially unwanted programs (PUP),” the researchers noted.

In other cases, the ad would redirect them to a domain hosting an exploit kit. If successful, the kit would drop a malware downloader onto the victim’s machine.

trojanized WordPress themes

What can you do?

The researchers advise organizations to avoid using pirated software, enable and update Windows Defender if their web server is running Windows, and not to reuse passwords across multiple accounts.

End users should regularly update their OS and software and consider using a plugin like NoScript to prevent remote JavaScript code from running on their machine.

The researchers named the malicious sites offering the trojanized themes and offered indicators of compromised that can help organizations check and detect whether their web servers have been compromised.