Most global brands fail to implement security controls to prevent data leakage and theft

The global pandemic has seen the web take center stage. Banking, retail and other industries have seen large spikes in web traffic, and this trend is expected to become permanent.

global brands security controls

Global brands fail to implement security controls

As attackers ramp up efforts to exploit this crisis, a slew of high-profile attacks on global brands and record-breaking fines for GDPR breaches have had little impact on client-side security and data protection deployments.

There’s a troubling lack of security controls required to prevent data theft and loss through client-side attacks like Magecart, formjacking, cross-site scripting, and credit card skimming. These attacks exploit vulnerable JavaScript integrations running on 99% of the world’s top websites, Tala Security reveals.

The report indicates that security effectiveness against JavaScript vulnerabilities is declining, despite high-profile attacks and repeated industry warnings over the past 18 months, including the largest GDPR fine to date.

Without controls, every piece of code running on websites – from every vendor included in the site owner’s website supply chain – can modify, steal or leak information via client-side attacks enabled by JavaScript.

In many cases, this data leakage is taking place via whitelisted, legitimate applications, without the website owner’s knowledge. What this report indicates is that data risk is everywhere and effective controls are rarely applied.

Key findings highlight the scale of vulnerability and that the majority of global brands fail to deploy adequate security controls to guard against client-side attacks.

JavaScript risk has increased in 2020

The average website includes content from 32 third-party JavaScript vendors, up slightly from 2019. JavaScript powers richness but also the framework of what renders on customer browsers, including images, style sheets, fonts, media and content from 1st party source- the site owner.

Content delivered by third-party JavaScript integrations

58% of the content that displays on customer browsers is delivered by third-party JavaScript integrations identified above.

This website supply chain leverages client-side connections that operate outside the span of effective control in 98% of sampled websites. The client-side is a primary attack vector for website attacks today.

Websites expose data to an average of 17 domains

Despite increasing numbers of high-profile breaches, forms, found on 92% of websites expose data to an average of 17 domains. This is PII, credentials, card transactions, and medical records.

While most users would reasonably expect this data to be accessible to the website owner’s servers and perhaps a payment clearing house, the analysis shows that this data is exposed to nearly 10X more domains than intended.

Nearly one-third of websites studied expose data to more than 20 domains. This provides some insight into how and why attacks like Magecart, formjacking and card skimming continue largely unabated.

No attack is more widespread than XSS

While other client-side attacks such as Magecart capture most of the headlines, no attack is more widespread than Cross-Site Scripting (XSS). This study found that 97% of websites are using dangerous JavaScript functions that could serve as injection points to initiate a DOM XSS attack.

Standards-based security controls exist that can prevent these attacks. They are infrequently applied.

Unfortunately, despite high-profile risks and the availability of controls, there has been no significant increase in the adoption of security capable of preventing client-side attacks:

  • Over 99% of websites are at risk from trusted, whitelisted domains like Google Analytics. These can be leveraged to exfiltrate data, underscoring the need for continuous PII leakage monitoring and prevention. This has significant implications for data privacy, and by extension, GDPR and CCPA.
  • 30% of the websites analyzed had implemented security policies – an encouraging 10% increase over 2019. However…
  • Only 1.1% of websites were found to have effective security in place – an 11% decline from 2019. It indicates that while deployment volume went up, effectiveness declined more steeply. The attackers have the upper hand largely because we are not playing effective defense.

Client-side web security

To address attacks such as XSS, Magecart and other card skimming exploits found in modern eCommerce environments, the use of client-side web security methods is beginning to emerge as a particularly useful practice.

client-side web security

Obviously, enterprise teams should integrate client-side protections with desired server-side countermeasures to ensure a full risk management profile (e.g., the client-side is a poor selection point to stop denial of service).

Several standards-based client-side security approaches have begun to mature that are worth examining from the perspective of website security and protection of browser sessions from malicious exploits. The best client-side security platforms automate implementation of these standards-based controls with emphasis on simplicity of administration. A typical, representative platform is used to demonstrate necessary client-side security controls.

Content security policy

To understand client-side security platforms, it helps to first explore the specifics of a standard approach known as a content security policy (CSP). This is a standard that is designed to address several types of web breaches such as cross-site scripting, click-jacking and form-jacking (all described earlier in this article series). CSP is also designed to reduce the risk of client-side malware injected from an infected advertising ecosystem.

CSPs are implemented as standard directives involving HTTP headers or page tags that specify which domains, subdomains, and resources a browser can load from a website. CSP use is consistent with the browsers any user would likely use including Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. The goal is that if malicious code is resident on a site, then visitors to that site would be prevented by the CSP from being directed to the hacker’s domain.

client-side web security

Figure 1. Content security policy

The example shown above in Figure 1 is taken directly from the original W3 recommendation. The CSP code can be interpreted as follows: Each source expression represents the location where content of the type specified is allowed to be pulled. To illustrate this whitelist security operation, consider that the self keyword-source designation, in the example above, represents the set of URIs in the origin as the protected website.

Companies like Google have rolled out CSP successfully and are using it to stop attacks against their web applications daily. However, CSP is deployed only lightly in most web application environments. The challenge with CSP implementation has been its complex administration. Tala Security researchers have found, for example, that roughly two percent of website operators in the top Alexa 1000 websites deploy the standard to prevent client-side attacks. Assisting with this administrative challenge is a primary motivation for client-side platforms.

Client-side security protection results from using CSP can websites can be quite impressive. Here are some observed statistics from the Tala Security research team based on their experiences with client-side security support:

  • Images – The average website in the Alexa 1000 loads images from roughly sixteen different external domains. The img-src directive in CSP blocks images from any unwanted or potentially malicious sites.
  • Stylesheets – The average website in the Alexa 1000 loads stylesheets from roughly two different external domains. The style-src directive in CSP blocks stylesheet loads from any unwanted or potentially malicious sites.
  • Fonts – The average website in the Alexa 1000 loads images from roughly one-and-a-half different external domains. The font-src directive in CSP blocks font downloads from any unwanted or potentially malicious sites.
  • Media – The average website in the Alexa 1000 loads images from different external domains. The media-src directive in CSP blocks font downloads from any unwanted or potentially malicious sites.

Subresource integrity

An additional applicable cyber security standard from the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) is known as subresource integrity (SRI). This standard is designed to validate resources being served up by any third party on a visited website. Such third parties include content distribution networks (CDNs), where it has not been uncommon to find malicious code being offered up to unsuspecting websites.

SRI is implemented through cryptographic hash functions which finger-print JavaScript being offered by third parties. Browsers can then fetch a resource, check the cryptographic hash value – which include the location of the resource, and then make a policy decision about whether to accept the resource. This capability is supported in all important browsers, and significantly reduces the risk of malware from third party actors.

Client-side security platform

Client-side security platforms will make use of both CSP and SRI to provide effective client-side protections. The goal of these platform is to provide policy-based mitigation of fine-grained behavior for third-party sources where content is being served. Client-side platforms can then watch for any data collection suggestive of the attacks used by Magecart (and similar groups).

The client browser mitigation should be implemented based on artificial intelligence-based classification and learning. The software should install quickly and easily. Commercial platforms should support implementation for many target environments including Apache Nginx, IIS, NodeJS, and others. Performance and latency impacts should also be essentially non-existent and non-affecting of the user experience. Specific capabilities included in a commercial platform should include:

  • Indicator evaluation – The selected platform should be designed to evaluate many different indicators of a web page’s architecture to analyze code, content, connections, and data exchange.
  • Behavioral and risk modeling – The platform should include support for analysis to inform a behavioral and risk modeling task designed to highlight normal behavior and expose vulnerabilities.
  • Operational improvement – Insights gained from the platform evaluation and modeling should be made available to help prevent client-side attacks such as XSS, Magecart, and the like.

The operation of world-class client side security platforms should include an on-going interaction between four different activities: Build, Monitor, Block, and Respond. The connection flow between these different lifecycle phases is depicted below.

client-side web security

Figure 2. Commercial client-side security lifecycle

Information model

Client-side security platforms should implement some type of information model that can be used to analyze the different behaviors on pages from the customer’s website to be protected. The security objective for such extraction should be to explicitly identify any sources of code and content on these web pages, as well as to find any data exchange support options that could involve sensitive data.

The resultant behavioral information model will thus provide a functional baseline on which to perform the necessary client-side risk management. The goal obviously should be to determine in real-time whether the site is vulnerable to attacks, third-party insertion, or other advanced breaches. As one would expect, performance of such behavioral modeling and protection in real-time complements any existing server-side security tools.

Contributing author: Aanand Krishnan, CEO, Tala Security.

A client-side perspective on web security

Threats to web security are explained in this first of a three-part article series, and client-side security is shown to address a commonly missed class of cyber attack exemplified by Magecart. Traditional solutions to web security are outlined, including a new approach to web security based on client-side standards such as content security policy and subresource integrity. These emerging approaches are explained in the context of a representative client-side security platform.

threats web security

Introduction

Perhaps the most salient aspect of cybersecurity as a professional discipline is its continuous cycle of change. That is, as cyber attacks emerge that challenge the confidentiality, integrity, or availability of some on-line resource, corresponding protection solutions are invented to reduce the risk. Once these solutions become integrated into the underlying fabric of the resource of interest, new cyber-attacks emerge, and new solutions are invented – and the cycle continues.

In some cases, new protective cyber solutions have the side-benefit anticipating new forms of malicious attacks – and in cases where this works, security risks are often avoided in a wide range of different scenarios. Two-factor authentication, for example, was created in response to password guessing, but is now an important component in the design of new Internet of Things (IoT) machine-to-machine application protocols to reduce risk.

Nowhere is this process of introducing and mitigating cyber risk more obvious than in web security – also referred to as web application security. With valuable assets being provisioned and managed increasingly through web-based interfaces, the value of web-based exploits continues to rise. One consequence of this rise is that despite the many technologies available to protect web resources, the gap between offense and defense is growing.

A main premise in this technical series is that this web security gap stems from the fact that most application execution occurs on the modern browser. The web security community has long recognized the need to deploy functional controls to safeguard the server-side vulnerability of web servers delivering content and capability to client browsers. Too little attention, however, has been placed on this client-side vulnerability, which is attractive to attackers and largely ignored by today’s security infrastructure.

The three parts that follow in our series are intended to help address this oversight. In Part 1, we offer an introduction to the most common cyber attacks that target websites today. Part 2 then provides an overview of the web security solutions that are deployed in most production environments today. Finally, Part 3 offers an introduction to how a representative client-side security solution can help rectify the client-side weaknesses exploited by bad actors today.

Common attacks to websites

Commensurate with Tim Berners-Lee’s idea in the mid-1990’s to layer hypertext protocols and markup languages onto the Internet protocol (IP) came the emergence of offensive means to attack the infrastructure, systems, and applications that make up the now-called web. And thus was born the discipline of web security, which can be defined as the set of protective measures required to manage the security risk of web-based computing.

As one would expect, the taxonomy of web security issues quickly grew in several directions, but early focus was on avoiding denial of service attacks, protecting hosting infrastructure, and ensuring free flow of web content to users. Such focus on availability corresponded to the observation that if a website was down or not working properly, then eCommerce transactions would not occur – which had obvious revenue implications.

In addition to these infrastructure concerns, however, came a growing observation that application-level security issues might have severe consequences – often to the privacy of customers visiting a website. Thus was born the so-called web applications threat, which quickly evolved from a small concern to a massive security challenge. Even today, finding sites with exploitable vulnerabilities in their web applications is an easy task.

Several standard attack strategies have emerged in recent years that have been difficult to eradicate. These nagging problems prey on the complexity of many web application designs, and on the relative inexperience and ignorance of many web software administrators. Below, we describe these strategies – four in total – that continue to drive risk into eCommerce infrastructure and to cause challenges for many enterprise security teams:

Cross-Site Scripting (XSS)

The most common application-level web security attack is called cross-site scripting or just XSS. A cross-site attack involves a technique known as injection – where the attacker finds a way to get scripts running on a target website. The ultimate goal is for that targeted web application to send the attacker’s code to some unknowing user’s browser. The XSS attack works best when a website accepts, processes, and uses input without much checking.

The end goal is that the attacker has managed to inject code into someone’s browser. That user will expect any downloaded scripts to be fine, since they came as dynamic content from the visited, and presumably trusted website. Their browser will then execute this code, often JavaScript, thus exposing sensitive information such as session tokens or cookies to the original attacker. The XSS code can also redirect a user to some infected website.

threats web security

Figure 1. XSS Attack Schema

Organizations such as Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP) suggest various defenses against XSS attacks. Their suggestions, many of which continue to be ignored by practitioners, involve common-sense coding and web administrative procedures that improve the processing of data from users. Most involve better validation of input data on the server side, which is a welcome security control and should be present in any web ecosystem.

Content and Ad injection

The challenge of dealing with content and ad injection attacks, also known as malvertising, has increased substantially in recent years. This should come as no surprise given the rise of the on-line advertising ecosystem as a force in modern business. Some estimates have the size of on-line advertising now reaching aggregate levels as high as $100B. Hackers and criminals understand this trend – and take advantage of exploitable weaknesses.

The way malvertising works follows a similar pattern to XSS attacks: Malicious actors find ways to inject their code onto websites through legitimate advertising networks. The goal, again similar to XSS, is to target visitors to the site, usually with the intent to redirect their browsers to some targeted website that has been planted with malware and that forms the basis for whatever attack is desired, such as credential theft.

Many observers have referenced the injection process as involving something called a drive-by download. This term references a user viewing an advertisement using a browser with an exploitable vulnerability (which is sadly a common scenario). While the user interacts with the ad, a redirection process is initiated whereby the malicious software finds its way to the unsuspecting visitor to the site.

threats web security

Figure 2. Drive-By Download via Malvertising

The traditional solution to this problem involves placing a control such as a web application firewall (WAF) in-line with the access. The WAF would be programmed to use signature or behavioral analysis to stop malicious code execution from untrusted sources. As with XSS security, this server-side protection is commonly found in advertising ecosystems as a primary control. Such emphasis can address malvertising, but might not work for all forms of attacks.

Magecart

The hacking group Magecart emerged several years ago, terrorizing websites with an attack known as card skimming. Normally, hacking groups tend to come and go quickly, but Magecart hit a nerve with their targeted breaches of enterprise websites and web applications. Wide ranges of different organizations saw their sites formjacked, and security solutions were not immediately evident to most victims.

The man-in-the-middle attack from Magecart is quite simple to explain: It begins with malicious code added to the JavaScript served to clients from a website. The malicious code then watches for and collects sensitive data such as credit card information from legitimate users visiting the site with their browser. The data is exfiltrated to a malicious drop site and is unloaded in the usual illegal manner. It’s that simple.

threats web security

Figure 3. Magecart Card Skimming

The nagging issue, however, is that common server-side security tools don’t account for this man-in-the-browser (MITB) attack because it occurs on the client side. Web application firewalls (WAFs), for example, don’t see the JavaScript activity and have no means for scanning libraries for code insertions. And when this attack is served from third or fourth-party hosted sites, the cascading result is something called piggy-backing.

Contributing author: Aanand Krishnan, CEO, Tala Security.

RSA Conference announces finalists for Innovation Sandbox Contest 2020

RSA Conference announced the 10 finalists for its Innovation Sandbox Contest 2020. The competition calls on the most promising young companies in cybersecurity to showcase their transformative technologies to a panel of judges and live audience at RSA Conference 2020 in San Francisco. Past winners include Imperva, Phantom, and most recently, Axonius.

Innovation Sandbox Contest 2020

Dr. Herbert (Hugh) Thompson

On Monday, February 24, the finalists will present a three-minute pitch followed by a question-and-answer round as they battle on stage for the title of “Most Innovative Startup.” The renowned panel of expert judges includes:

  • Asheem Chandna, Partner, Greylock Partners
  • Scott Darling, President, Dell Technologies Capital
  • Dorit Dor, VP Products, Check Point Software Technologies
  • Patrick Heim, Partner and CISO ClearSky
  • Paul Kocher, Researcher and Entrepreneur.

Dr. Herbert (Hugh) Thompson, Program Committee Chair of RSA Conference, will return to host the contest.

The Innovation Sandbox Contest 2020 finalists (in alphabetical order) are:

AppOmni

AppOmni is a leading software-as-a-service (SaaS) security and management platform providing data access visibility, management, and security of SaaS solutions. AppOmni’s patent-pending technology deeply scans APIs, security controls, and configuration settings to secure mission-critical and sensitive data.

Blu Bracket

BluBracket is an enterprise security solution for code in a software-driven world. BluBracket gives companies visibility into where source code introduces security risk while also enabling them to fully secure their code—without altering developer workflows or productivity.

Elevate Security

Elevate Security solves for the human element. Using data companies already have, Elevate Security scores employee risk based on their security actions, showing actionable trends while delivering personalized communications that nudge employees to better security habits.

ForAllSecure

ForAllSecure aims to secure the world’s software. Using patented technology from CMU research, ForAllSecure delivers a next generation fuzzing solution to Fortune 1000 companies in telecom, aerospace, automotive and more. DARPA named ForAllSecure a Cyber Grand Challenge winner and MIT Tech Review named it one of the 50 Smartest Companies.

INKY Technology

INKY is an industry leader in mail protection powered by unique computer vision, artificial intelligence, and machine learning. The company’s flagship product, INKY Phish Fence, uses these novel techniques to “see” each email much like a human does, to block phishing attacks that get through every other system.

Obsidian Security

Obsidian Cloud Detection and Response delivers frictionless security for SaaS. Using a unique identity graph and machine learning, Obsidian stops the most advanced attacks in the cloud. Unified visibility across applications, users, and data provides threat detection, breach remediation, and security hardening with no production impact.

SECURITI.ai

SECURITI.ai is a leader in AI-powered PrivacyOps. Its PRIVACI.ai solution automates privacy compliance with patent-pending People Data Graphs and robotic automation. It enables enterprises to give rights to people on their data, comply with global privacy regulations and build trust with customers.

Sqreen

Sqreen is the application security platform for the modern enterprise. Organizations of all sizes trust Sqreen to protect, observe and test their software. As opposed to pattern-based approaches, Sqreen analyses in-app execution in real time to deliver more robust security without compromising performance.

Tala Security

Tala safeguards the modern web against client-side risk. Tala’s AI-driven analytics engine continuously interrogates site architecture to work in concert with an advanced automation engine that activates standards-based security to prevent a broad range of client-side attacks like magecart, XSS, session re-directs, and client-side malware.

Vulcan Cyber

Vulcan is a vulnerability remediation and orchestration platform that is modernizing the way enterprises reduce cyber risk. With its remediation-driven approach, Vulcan automates and orchestrates the vulnerability remediation lifecycle, enabling security, operational and business teams to effectively remediate cyber risks at scale.

“The RSAC Innovation Sandbox has catapulted young companies to success for well over a decade. In fact, the top 10 finalists have collectively seen 48 acquisitions and raised $5.2 billion in investments to-date,” said Linda Gray Martin, Senior Director and General Manager, RSA Conference. “But what’s really exciting is how the competition has propelled the entire cybersecurity community forward by encouraging much-needed innovation and collaboration in an industry that faces new changes, threats and challenges every day. This year’s finalists will undoubtedly make for a tough decision for the judges and a must-see event for RSA Conference attendees.”

The contest kicks off at 1:30 PM PT on February 24 at the Moscone Center and winners will be announced at 4:30 PM that same day.

Cybercriminals targeting e-commerce website vulnerabilities this holiday season

Expect unprecedented levels of online data theft this holiday season due to a lack of deployed client-side security measures.

data theft holiday season

Disturbing lack of security measures

Tala Security highlights the widespread vulnerability resulting from integrations that enable and enhance website functionality. These integrations, which exist on nearly every modern website operating today, allow attackers to target PII and payment information.

98% of the Alexa 1000 websites were found to be lacking security measures capable of preventing attacks. In related warnings, both the FBI and the PCI Council cautioned that hackers are targeting online credit card information.

“Online merchants and website owners must recognize the critical need for client-side security. The fundamental driver of online commerce — consumer trust — is at stake as attackers target widespread client-side vulnerabilities to steal credentials, credit card numbers, financial data and other PII,” said Aanand Krishnan, CEO and co-founder of Tala Security.

data theft holiday season

Key findings from the survey

  • Only 2% of Alexa 1000 sites have implemented effective controls to prevent personal, financial and credential theft.
  • User form data sent, captured on forms available on 98% of websites, is exposed to 10 times more domains than intended by the website owner. This creates a massive opportunity for data theft from attackers.
  • The average website relies on 31 third-party integrations, which provide nearly two-thirds of the content customers view on their browsers. This content is delivered via client-side connections that lack effective security controls.
  • Most consumers will be surprised to learn that only one-third of the content rendering on their browser is owned, created and served by the owner of the website. The remaining two-thirds is served via client-side connections that lack effective security.
  • Although 27% of website owners attempt to deploy security measures, only 2% succeed in deploying effective policies capable of preventing client-side attacks.