Windows

New Windows Zero-Day

New Windows Zero-Day

Google’s Project Zero has discovered and published a buffer overflow vulnerability in the Windows Kernel Cryptography Driver. The exploit doesn’t affect the cryptography, but allows attackers to escalate system privileges:

Attackers were combining an exploit for it with a separate one targeting a recently fixed flaw in Chrome. The former allowed the latter to escape a security sandbox so the latter could execute code on vulnerable machines.

The vulnerability is being exploited in the wild, although Microsoft says it’s not being exploited widely. Everyone expects a fix in the next Patch Tuesday cycle.

Sidebar photo of Bruce Schneier by Joe MacInnis.

Microsoft is adding Linux, Android, and firmware protections to Windows

Screenshot of antivirus protection.

Microsoft is moving forward with its promise to extend enterprise security protections to non-Windows platforms with the general release of a Linux version and a preview of one for Android. The software maker is also beefing up Windows security protections to scan for malicious firmware.

The Linux and Android moves—detailed in posts published on Tuesday here, here, and here—follow a move last year to ship antivirus protections to macOS. Microsoft disclosed the firmware feature last week.

Premium pricing

All the new protections are available to users of Microsoft Advanced Threat Protection and require Windows 10 Enterprise Edition. Public pricing from Microsoft is either non-existent or difficult to find, but according to this site, costs range from $30 to $72 per machine per year to enterprise customers.

In February, when the Linux preview became available, Microsoft said it included antivirus alerts and “preventive capabilities.” Using a command line, admins can manage user machines, initiate and configure antivirus scans, monitor network events, and manage various threats.

“We are just at the beginning of our Linux journey and we are not stopping here!” Tuesday’s post announcing the Linux general availability said. “We are committed to continuous expansion of our capabilities for Linux and will be bringing you enhancements in the coming months.”

The Android preview, meanwhile, provides several protections, including:

  • The blocking of phishing sites and other high-risk domains and URLs accessed through SMS/text, WhatsApp, email, browsers, and other apps. The features use the same Microsoft Defender SmartScreen services that are already available for Windows so that decisions to block suspicious sites will apply across all devices on a network.
  • Proactive scanning for malicious or potentially unwanted applications and files that may be downloaded to a mobile device.
  • Measures to block access to network resources when devices show signs of being compromised with malicious apps or malware.
  • Integration to the same Microsoft Defender Security Center that’s already available for Windows, macOS, and Linux.

Last week, Microsoft said it had added firmware protection to the premium Microsoft Defender. The new offering scans Unified Extensible Firmware Interface, which is the successor to the traditional BIOS that most computers used during the boot process to locate and enumerate hardware installed.

The firmware scanner uses a new component added to virus protection already built into Defender. Hacks that infect firmware are particularly pernicious because they survive reinstallations of the operating system and other security measures. And because firmware runs before Windows starts, it has the ability to burrow deep into an infected system. Until now, there have been only limited ways to detect such attacks on large fleets of machines.

It makes sense that the extensions to non-Windows platforms are available only to enterprises and cost extra. I was surprised, however, that Microsoft is charging a premium for the firmware protection and only offering it to enterprises. Plenty of journalists, attorneys, and activists are equally if not more threatened by so-called evil maid attacks, in which a housekeeper or other stranger has the ability to tamper with firmware during brief physical access to a computer.

Microsoft has a strong financial incentive to make Windows secure for all users. Company representatives didn’t respond to an email asking if the firmware scanner will become more widely available.

Cryptic Rumblings Ahead of First 2020 Patch Tuesday

Sources tell KrebsOnSecurity that Microsoft Corp. is slated to release a software update on Tuesday to fix an extraordinarily serious security vulnerability in a core cryptographic component present in all versions of Windows. Those sources say Microsoft has quietly shipped a patch for the bug to branches of the U.S. military and to other high-value customers/targets that manage key Internet infrastructure, and that those organizations have been asked to sign agreements preventing them from disclosing details of the flaw prior to Jan. 14, the first Patch Tuesday of 2020.

According to sources, the vulnerability in question resides in a Windows component known as crypt32.dll, a Windows module that Microsoft says handles “certificate and cryptographic messaging functions in the CryptoAPI.” The Microsoft CryptoAPI provides services that enable developers to secure Windows-based applications using cryptography, and includes functionality for encrypting and decrypting data using digital certificates.

A critical vulnerability in this Windows component could have wide-ranging security implications for a number of important Windows functions, including authentication on Windows desktops and servers, the protection of sensitive data handled by Microsoft’s Internet Explorer/Edge browsers, as well as a number of third-party applications and tools.

Equally concerning, a flaw in crypt32.dll might also be abused to spoof the digital signature tied to a specific piece of software. Such a weakness could be exploited by attackers to make malware appear to be a benign program that was produced and signed by a legitimate software company.

This component was introduced into Windows more than 20 years ago — back in Windows NT 4.0. Consequently, all versions of Windows are likely affected (including Windows XP, which is no longer being supported with patches from Microsoft).

Microsoft has not yet responded to requests for comment. However, KrebsOnSecurity has heard rumblings from several sources over the past 48 hours that this Patch Tuesday (tomorrow) will include a doozy of an update that will need to be addressed immediately by all organizations running Windows.

Update 7:49 p.m. ET: Microsoft responded, saying that it does not discuss the details of reported vulnerabilities before an update is available. The company also said it does “not release production-ready updates ahead of regular Update Tuesday schedule. “Through our Security Update Validation Program (SUVP), we release advance versions of our updates for the purpose of validation and interoperability testing in lab environments,” Microsoft said in a written statement. “Participants in this program are contractually disallowed from applying the fix to any system outside of this purpose and may not apply it to production infrastructure.”

Original story:

Will Dormann, a security researcher who authors many of the vulnerability reports for the CERT Coordination Center (CERT-CC), tweeted today that “people should perhaps pay very close attention to installing tomorrow’s Microsoft Patch Tuesday updates in a timely manner. Even more so than others. I don’t know…just call it a hunch?” Dormann declined to elaborate on that teaser.

It could be that the timing and topic here (cryptography) is nothing more than a coincidence, but KrebsOnSecurity today received a heads up from the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) stating that NSA’s Director of Cybersecurity Anne Neuberger is slated to host a call on Jan. 14 with the news media that “will provide advanced notification of a current NSA cybersecurity issue.”

The NSA’s public affairs folks did not respond to requests for more information on the nature or purpose of the discussion. The invitation from the agency said only that the call “reflects NSA’s efforts to enhance dialogue with industry partners regarding its work in the cybersecurity domain.”

Stay tuned for tomorrow’s coverage of Patch Tuesday and possibly more information on this particular vulnerability.

Windows 10 May 2019 Update now rolling out to everyone… slowly

Stylized image of glass skyscrapers under construction.

To avoid a replay of the problems faced by the Windows 10 October 2018 Update, version 1809, Microsoft has taken a very measured approach to the release of the May 2019 Update, version 1903, with both a long spell as release candidate and a much less aggressive rollout to Windows Update.

That rollout starts today. While you previously needed to be in the Insider Program (or have a source such as an MSDN subscription) to download and install version 1903, it’s now open to everyone through Windows Update.

However, Windows users are unlikely to see the update automatically installed for many months. Initially, only those who explicitly visit Windows Update and click “Check for Updates” will be offered version 1903, and even then, they’ll have to explicitly choose to download and install the update. This is part of Microsoft’s attempt to make Windows Update less surprising: feature updates are offered separately from regular updates because feature updates take a long time to install and regular updates don’t (or at least, they shouldn’t). This installation experience requires the use of version 1803 or 1809, and it also requires the most recent monthly patch, which is also released today.

The update is also available to those who download either the update tool or media creation tool from Microsoft.

Starting from June, the update will be pushed to users currently on Windows 10 version 1803, as that version will cease receiving updates this November. And corporations using patch management systems can schedule deployments in whatever way they choose. Beyond that, however, Microsoft says that, for now at least, the update won’t be automatically installed. This marks a great change from previous Windows 10 feature updates and means that uptake of the May update is likely to be severely impeded.

Notable features of version 1903 include better Kaomoji support, application sandboxing, and the separation of Cortana and searching.

Password1, Password2, Password3 no more: Microsoft drops password expiration rec

Password1, Password2, Password3 no more: Microsoft drops password expiration rec

For many years, Microsoft has published a security baseline configuration: a set of system policies that are a reasonable default for a typical organization. This configuration may be sufficient for some companies, and it represents a good starting point for those corporations that need something stricter. While most of the settings have been unproblematic, one particular decision has long drawn the ire of end-users and helpdesks alike: a 60-day password expiration policy that forces a password change every two months. That reality is no longer: the latest draft for the baseline configuration for Windows 10 version 1903 and Windows Server version 1903 drops this tedious requirement.

The rationale for the previous policy is that it limits the impact a stolen password can have—a stolen password will automatically become invalid after, at most, 60 days. In reality, however, password expiration tends to make systems less safe, not more, because computer users don’t like picking or remembering new passwords. Instead, they’ll do something like pick a simple password and then increment a number on the end of the password, making it easy to “generate” a new password whenever they’re forced to.

In the early days of computing, this might have been a sensible trade-off, because cracking passwords was relatively slow. But these days, with rainbow tables, GPU acceleration, and the massive computational power of the cloud, that’s no longer the case—short passwords are a liability, so any policy that makes people favor short passwords is a bad policy. It’s better instead to choose a long password and, ideally, multifactor authentication, supplementing the password with a time-based code or something similar.

The baseline configs are often used by auditors, with companies dinged for each baseline policy they don’t follow. Accordingly, Microsoft is making a few other changes to the baseline in an effort to ensure that audits only pick up security configurations that are truly important. Previously, the baseline would require that the strongest possible disk encryption is used (256-bit); it no longer does so. Some devices have a meaningful performance difference between 128- and 256-bit encryption, making 256-bit encryption undesirable. Others, like the Surface, ship with 128-bit encryption rather than 256-bit. Abiding by the policy means decrypting the disk and then re-encrypting it. Microsoft believes that 128-bit full-disk encryption is sufficient for most situations, and hence demanding 256-bit does little to improve security but hurts performance and requires tedious re-encryption.

In the new baseline, Microsoft is also considering dropping the long-standing requirement to disable the Guest account and the default Administrator account. Windows 10 disables the Guest account by default already, meaning that if it’s enabled, it’s probably for a good reason and shouldn’t be picked up in an audit.

The built-in Administrator account is also disabled by default in Windows 10, with the operating system creating a separate Administrator-privileged account during installation. However, the built-in account has certain properties that make it better—it isn’t subject to account lockout policies, and it can’t be removed from the Administrators group. As such, the decision to use the built-in Administrator account or a different one is more a matter of taste than security.

McAfee joins Sophos, Avira, Avast—the latest Windows update breaks them all

A colorized transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of an Ebola virus virion. (Cynthia Goldsmith)

Enlarge / A colorized transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of an Ebola virus virion. (Cynthia Goldsmith)

The most recent Windows patch, released April 9, seems to have done something (still to be determined) that’s causing problems with anti-malware software. Over the last few days, Microsoft has been adding more and more antivirus scanners to its list of known issues. As of publication time, client-side antivirus software from Sophos, Avira, ArcaBit, Avast, and most recently McAfee are all showing problems with the patch.

Affected machines seem to be fine until an attempt is made to log in, at which point the system grinds to a halt. It’s not immediately clear if systems are freezing altogether or just going extraordinarily slowly. Some users have reported that they can log in, but the process takes ten or more hours. Logging in to Windows 7, 8.1, Server 2008 R2, Server 2012, and Server 2012 R2 are all affected.

Booting into safe mode is unaffected, and the current advice is to use this method to disable the antivirus applications and allow the machines to boot normally. Sophos additionally reports that adding the antivirus software’s own directory to the list of excluded locations also serves as a fix, which is a little strange.

Microsoft is currently blocking the update for Sophos, Avira, and ArcaBit users, with McAfee still under investigation. ArcaBit and Avast have published updates that address the problem. Avast recommends leaving systems at the login screen for about 15 minutes and then rebooting; the antivirus software should then update itself automatically in the background.

Avast and McAfee also provide a hint at the root cause: it appears that Microsoft has made a change to CSRSS (“client/server runtime subsystem”), a core component of Windows that coordinates and manages Win32 applications. This is reportedly making the antivirus software deadlock. The antivirus applications are trying to get access to some resource, but they’re blocked from doing so because they have already taken exclusive access to the resource.

Given that patches have appeared from antivirus vendors rather than an update from Microsoft, it suggests (though does not guarantee) that whatever change Microsoft made to CSRSS is revealing latent bugs in the antivirus software. On the other hand, it’s possible that CSRSS is now doing something that Microsoft previously promised wouldn’t happen.