Google aims to improve security of browser engines, third-party Android devices and apps on Google Play

This post was originally published on this site

Google has announced two new security initiatives: one is aimed at helping bug hunters improve the security of various browsers’ JavaScript engines, the other at helping Android OEMs improve the security of the mobile devices they ship.

Google new security initiatives

Fuzzing JavaScript engines

“JavaScript engine security continues to be critical for user safety, as demonstrated by recent in-the-wild zero-day exploits abusing vulnerabilities in v8, the JavaScript engine behind Chrome. Unfortunately, fuzzing JavaScript engines to uncover these vulnerabilities is generally quite expensive due to their high complexity and relatively slow processing of input,” noted Project Zero’s Samuel Groß.

Researchers must also bear the costs of fuzzing in advance, even though there’s a possibility their approach may not discover any bugs or if it does, that they’ll receive a reward for finding them. This fact might deter many of them and, consequently, bugs stay unfixed and exploitable for longer.

That’s why Google is offering $5,000 research grants in the form of Google Compute Engine credits.

Interested researchers must submit a proposal with details about their intended approach and the awarded credits must be used for fuzzing JavaScript engines with the approach described in the proposal.

They can fuzz the JavaScriptCore (Safari), v8 (Chrome, Edge), or Spidermonkey (Firefox), and must report the found vulnerabilities to the affected vendor. They must also publicly report on their findings within 6 months of the grant getting awarded.

Helping third parties in the Android ecosystem

The company is also set on improving the security of the Android ecosystem, and to that point it’s launching the Android Partner Vulnerability Initiative (APVI).

“Until recently, we didn’t have a clear way to process Google-discovered security issues outside of AOSP (Android Open Source Project) code that are unique to a much smaller set of specific Android OEMs,” the company explained.

“The APVI […] covers a wide range of issues impacting device code that is not serviced or maintained by Google (these are handled by the Android Security Bulletins).”

Already discovered issues and those yet to be unearthed have been/will be shared through this bug tracker.

Simultaneously, the company has is looking for a Security Engineering Manager in Android Security that will, among other things, lead a team that “will perform application security assessments against highly sensitive, third party Android apps on Google Play, working to identify vulnerabilities and provide remediation guidance to impacted application developers.”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

October 5, 2020